Tag Archives: Victoria

“Victoria’s Most Haunted” Gets A New Book by Ian Gibbs!

7 May

51nsewsef1l-_sx322_bo1204203200_By Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

Presentation at Bolen Books 
1644 Hillside Ave #111
on May 9, 7pm

Many long-time residents of Victoria, British Columbia will not dispute the fact that this garden city is haunted. More ghosts are said to spook specific streets here, and most of the downtown core and neighbouring districts are covered in Ian Gibb’s debut book, “Victoria’s Most Haunted.”

From bars to homes to restaurants and schools, this variety of sites is welcome. A few places are missed — some of which I had the fortune to check out during my time with PARAVI, a local paranormal investigative society (understandably not mentioned in the book because it’s no longer in operation) — but to get every story crammed in means obtaining permission not only from the group but also from the current business operators to talk about them.

I have found The Ghost Story Guy‘s collection (his handle in this paranormal pop culture business) to be a concise look at places both familiar and not. Gibbs has the Sixth Sense. While he does not use it to communicate with the spirit world, he can feel the energies out and describe what the mojo is like. I am thrilled his book covers a few new places previous publications have not. At least to my knowledge, not many new stories made it to print in the last 12 or so years. I heard of a few through the news, namely a photo of a supposed face materializing down a flight of stairs at Hatley Castle, but I did not spot anything when the image was published.

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Gibbs recounts recent activities and his brushes with the occult world with a narrative style that’s easy to visualize, and his personal account of his time working at Christ Church Cathedral School is this book’s highlight.

I smiled when I read his entry about the Young Building (Camosun College) because he included my own experiences there. This book is great by including historical notes in some chapters. This school’s most iconic building was built in 1913 and it was used as a normal school in the early years before being turned to a hospital. Of course, its purpose was changed in later years. Although Gibbs did not include the just-as-haunted Richmond House at the Lansdowne campus, because the ability to track down and talk to witnesses is not always easy, the accounts from staff to student shows he wants different perspectives. I related to him what I heard when I did my research for my college paper’s Halloween issue and had at least four experiences during my education here; half of which I’d say could easily be logically explained away. For those places that do not want to be listed, I’m sure the missing entries, like any mention of Doris Gravlin at the Victoria Golf Course, are considered overdone in comparison to Craigdarroch Castle, where the museum operators prefer to acknowledge the building is not haunted despite what witnesses say.

I became interested in the paranormal back in my early teens, but when cliques were the mainstays and the subject was not often openly talked about, I did not want to heavily advertise my interest. For this hobby, all the groups (even back then) exist to achieve the same goals and to say one gang is better than another always bugged me. Each club can use different methodologies, but when it decides to put on exhibitions, like “public ghost hunts,” I often wonder if the organization is simply offering circus-style entertainment for the curious or hoping proof of an afterlife will manifest when more witnesses are present to validate it? For the latter, a collective imagination wanting manifestation to happen can sway the results. Personal experiences make for better tales and Gibbs is wise to say, “The stories are meant to entertain, and neither the publisher nor the author claim that these stories represent fact. Additionally, it is not the author’s intention to influence anyone’s beliefs; instead, the author’s wish is that these stories will inspire, thrill, delight, and comfort.”

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Short of going to Britain, which has centuries of history and scarier tales of terror to go by, this corner of the Pacific Northwest has plenty for purveyors of this paranormal subculture to enjoy. True to the genre (i.e. in what you see on a few televised programs), Gibbs’ book is heavy on places readers can visit and yet include a few inaccessible places. The variety of tales he tells is excellent!

As for what is next from this author, I can see him embarking on a haunted road trip to examine all of Vancouver Island. Who knows, perhaps a look at Mount Tzouhalem near Duncan and Beban House in Nanaimo are next? Up in Northern Vancouver Island, the natural spring Devil’s Bath (located in Alice Lake Park) suggests some kind of dark history. To discover that past requires talking to locals to distinguish what is fact from the folklore. The Forbidden Plateau within Strathcona Park has a past I’m very interested in! It’s supposed to be haunted by first nations people and these are the type of stories best heard by the campfire. In the meantime, I’ll happily read “Victoria’s Most Haunted” by the shimmering light of the fireplace one more time.

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The 2017 Comic Arts Festival at Camosun College Grows! Recap & Gallery

17 Apr

By Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

The 2017 Camosun Comic Arts Festival (CCAF) is growing and for most, it has the feel of wanting to become bigger. As one vendor told me, it has everything people expect from such a larger show. As an event to spotlight local talent, everyone is here, including showing the next generation is ready. Gareth Gaudin‘s (of Legends Comics & Books and creator of the Perogy Cat) daughters are ready as father and his children have teamed up. Enid Jupiter and Lyra Gotham, the Monster Sisters, is an original comic which shows them facing off against the dark threats hiding in the fair city of Victoria, BC.

On April 15th, the third floor of the Young Building at the Lansdowne Campus was completely taken over by local talents (to name a few: Paul Chadwick, Nelson Dewey and Janine Johnston) and the graduates of this year’s Comics & Graphic Novels Program. Photos of some members of this class are offered in the gallery as seen below.

Plenty of range can be found, which includes me spotting a few reps from local gaming firms perhaps looking at talent to hire (I saw one person sporting a KANO/APPs shirt) and Codename Entertainment giving out bonus content pass-keys for their latest game Crusaders of the Lost Idols for people walking by.

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LANtasy 2017 is Taking Place This Weekend in Victoria, BC, But Will I Go?

17 Mar

By Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

Pearkes Recreation Center
3100 Tillicum Rd
Victoria, BC

March 18-19, 2017

To attend LANtasy 2017 or not to get my game geek on is debatable. At home, I have my three game consoles and a huge collection of Chaosium and GURPs role playing books. I like the idea of playing games with folks with similar tastes as mine. But in what I’m discovering post- Emerald City Comicon (ECCC) is whether or not smaller events can live up to what I enjoy from the bigger shows. Here, I can seek out those rare bits of merchandise, chat with players about those lost games, namely Nephilim, or try tabletop card demos.

I like to browse and wander through a huge hall of exhibitors (I kept on wandering back to Steve Jackson Games at ECCC to view their merchandise) and talk to companies to learn about what’s coming for the “industry” the convention is representing. This Seattle-based show has a floor dedicated to all things gaming, feels more welcoming (the staff here are really helpful and nicer if I had to start making comparisons) and is spaced out. That is, rooms exist to locate games in (controlling noise levels is always important) than to stuff it all into one huge basketball court.

A few local video game developers, namely Codename Entertainment and Piranha Games, are attending and supposedly, they are giving a panel somewhere in the Pearkes Recreation Center. But I can not find further information in where panels are located. It’s not clearly defined when there’s no online map to consult.

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[Victoria, BC] Cherry Bomb Toys to Explode with Party Room Goodness

3 Mar

Reposted from an article written by Ed Sum for TwoHungryBlokes.com. To see the full photoset, please visit the original article.

1069719-01Cherry Bomb Toys in Victoria, BC is expanding. Not only do they have the National Toy Museum of Canada, on the second floor, which showcases approximately 80 years of love for childhood knickknacks, but soon, they will be opening their basement for people to use on a by appointment basis. The official opening is tentatively set for the end of March.

This area will not be limited to families wishing to celebrate their child’s birthdays (or an adult’s) in a venue that does not have to be their home. B Woodword, manager of the store, explained that not everyone has the space, especially if they live downtown, and cleanup for a whole home can be a chore. This operation’s idea is to offer a safe space so people can have fun in. There’s an arcade area filled with classic gaming consoles (Nintendo and SEGA were spotted) and four separate television screens so anyone can game with. People can bring their own next-gen consoles, but the purpose of this space is to stay retro. A dining room type area (with a few basic kitchen essentials) exists so people can mingle in. Of course, washroom facilities is down the hall.

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