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The Legend of Zelda Encyclopedia Preview (North American Edition)

18 Jun

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

  • Spoiler Alert
  • Publication Date: June 19, 2018

The best part of owning a physical copy of The Legend of Zelda Encyclopedia is in reading how all the lore from the video games ties together by being able to flip back and forth to the references to other sections. This work sadly does not include Breath of the Wild because it was originally published in Japan last year, at the same time the game made its release. It’s safe to assume an addendum will happen. In the meantime, for fans of the games prior, there are 332 pages of goodness to digest. It completes the Goddess Collection—Hyrule Historia and Art & Artifacts. If the Tri-Force symbol needs its centre to be filled, a fourth volume is inevitable.

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The Life, Times and Advances in Puppetry with Mike Quinn

14 Jun

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Mike Quinn is a man of many cinematic trades—a talent mentored by Jim Henson and Frank Oz—and he sees a bright future for puppetry, a style of performance theatre. His passion for it predates meeting these two icons and he is fully aware of its rich history. At an early age, he staged his own live puppet shows for family and friends, and he was always encouraged to pursue his dreams.

This form of entertainment can be traced back to the days of early man. Some simply manipulated the stuffed dolls with their hands and others took the form further, like to have a light source cast upon them so their shadows are projected upon a larger surface. This technique not only helped make them become larger than life but also create a mystique to enthral many a viewer. Quinn is well aware of the many styles of puppetry that can be used to tell a story. In the 90’s, his shift to work behind the camera showed his passion also included directing. He worked on many a TV pilot in the UK and said Mira Mara was one program where he brought in skilled shadow puppeteers to perform while a human actress was regaling fantastic tales to a cast of puppets. It went to full series production, was filmed throughout Wales and Scotland, and was broadcast in Gaelic speaking countries.

“I think this style is a very poetic and abstract artistic way of doing visuals. I also enjoy watching a different form known as bunraku (Japanese puppet theatre). You have three people working a full figure on a tabletop. They are usually seen behind the puppet, sometimes dressed in black, partially visible … they study forever to be very precise. It’s incredible!” observed Quinn.

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You Know It’s Solo, A Star Wars Story Not Quite Rogue

25 May

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Harrison Ford is Han Solo. He made being a scruffy nerf herder charming. As the daring Indiana Jones, he knows when not to cheat death. George Lucas had a vision with the Young Indiana Jones series, to educate first and entertain second, the end product worked. Sean Patrick Flanery made us believe he was Indy and he was young enough so audiences can imagine his ageing process.

At least ten years must exist between when Solo (played slightly convincingly by Alden Ehrenreich) is seen running amok in the streets of Corellia trying to escape his life as a street urchin. He joins the Imperial Army and is soon kicked out due to insubordination. He hooks up with criminals and they hope to commit the Ocean’s 11 (technically not) of all heists. But it all goes terribly wrong, horribly wrong.

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Riding Bean is Mounting a Comeback on Kickstarter!

21 May

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Fans of Kenichi Sonoda has been asking him for years if there will ever be a Riding Bean sequel and at long last, he’s off to the races to make it happen through crowdfunding. The Kickstarter page shows he is at the halfway point.

To make a full-length original animation video or movie cost a lot of money. To make a short is not beyond reason. His goal is to produce a five minute piece. Should support skyrocket they will give value back to the fans by extending the length of the work. A 24-minute production is not beyond reason, but to hire the talent and get back the cast to voice this production will require time and perhaps investment by other folks within the industry.

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