Tag Archives: Disney

Avengers Infinity War — Thoughts on Thanos

29 Apr

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

  • Spoiler Alert

Avid followers of Marvel Entertainment’s works have reason to cheer. The ten-year ride to get to Avengers: Infinity War is finally here!

Essential to this film is knowing the events from the previous Avengers, Captain America, Guardians of the Galaxy films. The story continues from where Thor:Ragnarök left off.  When considering the focus is finally on the mad Titan Thanos, to learn about his back story is the highlight of this film.

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A Wrinkle In Time and Not Enough Space to Explain it All

10 Mar

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Disney’s adaptation of Madeleine L’Engle‘s young adult novel, A Wrinkle in Time is going to fall by the wayside like Tommorowland. The premise of the book is great. The big screen execution is muddled. Changes will always happen when making a movie from a book and the star power behind the three Fatimas – Mrs Whatsit (Reese Witherspoon), Mrs Who (Mindy Kaling), and Mrs Which (Oprah Winfrey) cannot carry the film. They are not the stars of this piece. Their etheric portrayal suggests their presence is important to guide Meg Murry (Storm Reid) on her journey of self-realization. This tween lost her astrophysicist father (Chris Pine) to some in-between realm and since then has been living in a haze.

When considering much of the story is told in Meg’s perspective, any extra bits of explanation is saved for later. Her adoptive younger brother, Charles Wallace, is the only person who stays positive. When he finally invites Mrs Whatsit into the Murry household, the adventure is about to begin.

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Olaf’s Frozen Adventure is not so Chilly & Hints at Sequel

26 Nov

Olaf’s Frozen Adventure is the opening act before PIXAR’s Coco, and unless you are a fan of this character, this 20 minute computer animated adventure is almost worth skipping — at least to arrive late at the theater. I can certainly understand why audiences in Mexico disliked it; including it made no sense in a country preparing for Día de Muertos. While the themes certainly connect, Christmas is certainly not in everyone’s mind much less Thanksgiving, which is a American holiday this long weekend.

At the same time, not everyone are fans of Josh Gad. He gets center stage in this story about discovering what festive traditions exist on the day before yuletide and before the bell rings. Anna and Elsa invited their entire kingdom to come celebrate, but instead they politely decline because they have their own to take care off since it’s the eve. Olaf is sad these young ladies do not have their own and embarks on a look at what the people of Arendelle are doing. The list is straight out of Christmas, from candy canes to holiday logs — minus Krampus (he’s further south). A few laughs exist to get younger children smiling.

The new musical numbers are good. The best, of course, is saved for last. The bits of story are said to help bridge entry to the cinematic sequel. As Elsa is finally comfortable with her powers, just what can threaten this kingdom will have to be big. Perhaps there may be an invasion. After all, a few bridges were burnt in the fallout from the last film. Not all the neighboring kingdoms are certain to remain all that friendly.

Peaking into the Layers of Folklore in Pixar’s Coco

24 Nov

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By Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

Despite reports of Disney•Pixar having a troubled start in the development of Coco, the movie I saw in all its charming glory and the reveal of how many anthropological experts were acknowledged in the movie credits certainly put any concerns to rest. The fact Hispanic illustrator Lalo Alcaraz was one such person hired on to ensure accuracy made this animated take in what Día de Muertos is about all the more enjoyable. As a group, these people insured this animated film is culturally relevant. Together, with director Lee Unkrich (Toy Story 2 & 3) and writers Adrian Molina, Jason Katz and Matthew Aldrich, they made a film that’s true to the spirit of many past Pixar films, where keeping family ties is important.

Not everyone is fully aware about what the Day of the Dead represents. As a film about young Miguel Rivera (Anthony Gonzalez) wanting to be a musician instead of a cobbler — against his family’s wishes — just what he has to face in his journey is an adventure. From the land of the living to the city of the dead to find his great-great-grandfather, all he wants is someone’s blessing for what he wants to do for the rest of his life. Upon stealing a guitar in a mausoleum, he inadvertently enters the afterlife and pretty soon, he meets his deceased relatives. They are, pardoning the pun, aghast and side with his great grandmother’s desire to keep the family away from ever enjoying music. None are allowed to listen to it or perform.

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