Tag Archives: Based on Cartoon

LEGO’s Garmadon is Breaking Bad With His Own Solo Adventure!

28 May

LEGO® NINJAGO®: GARMADON #1 CoverNinjago’s greatest villain, Garmadon, now has a comic book! This self-titled work is a joint collaboration between Image Comics, Skybound and The Lego Company and the first two issues have everything to satisfy fans of the cartoon. There are linguring questions that needs answering.

The only thing really missing is a mini-fig to go with the release, and I suspect that’s being saved for the eventual trade paperback. This series answers nearly everything you want to know about this villain but are afraid to ask. Thankfully, readers don’t have to recall everything from the animated series to know where this series is headed.

Garmadon walked away from it all in season 10, March of the Oni and I’ve talked about the season in my look of that chapter. He once wanted to conquer all of Ninjago, and after defeating the greatest threat of them all, the Oni, I suspect the desire to control an entire world just isn’t good enough. He learned to be part of a greater whole. Ever since then, he’s uncertain about where his future lays. He’ll have to reevaluate his goals.

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Just Rewriting the Canon in Disney’s Cruella

31 May

Cruella (film) - WikipediaBy Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

On Disney Plus
(additional fees may apply)

Very few origin stories are going to live up to the stylish path that Disney’s Cruella is known for. When trying to deliver the goods, namely in creating an arc we can care for, this film nicely dodges some uneasy truths from past takes. In the animated version, she wore the soft furs of slain Dalmatians. In this live-action film’s case, she won’t touch an ounce of their fur, and it was an accusation made by her rival. The tables are turned as the story is more about who is the the alpha female. The black and white is more suggestive of which of the two personalities define this titular character.

Props go to director Craig Gillespie for having a solid vision in reveling in the punk rock subculture of London. The early 70s focus was a time of uncertainty and change, even though I sensed more of a 60s vibe. This backdrop does a little jump in time since it goes from showing how a very young Estella (Tipper Seifert-Cleveland) loses her mom to that of a young woman (played by Emma Stone).

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