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A Different Kind of Top Ten Movies to Continue Self Isolating With…

28 Mar

Image result for the day the earth stood stillBy Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

As folks continue to self-isolate, I’m not ready to admit defeat from all this COVID-19 madness. In this thought experiment, I can see a light at the end of the tunnel.

The modern Prometheus can give us hope instead of total destruction. Everyone is expecting the Night of the Living Dead to rise and tear humanity asunder. It’s the Invasion of the Body Snatchers, no less. Yes, tis the Day the Earth Stood Still. The alpha patient will destroy us all with this Resident Evil, and the Omega Man can give us hope. But can he rise to say, “I am Legend?”

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Japan is Too Cool with this Latest Update!

24 Mar

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Tim Craig’ss Cool Japan 2nd Edition is a very welcome update to looking at what’s trending, and how it affects the industry. The term was coined circa 2005 and when this look “Inside Japan’s Cultural and Creative Industries” can change overnight due to many influences–be it on a global scale or amid crisis–the effects are often longer term than a return to form.

The fast and furious industries in the business side of Japanese side entertainment–ranging from anime fandom to J-pop to manga and sumo (to name a few)–are not the only industries affected by change. The Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry coined the term.

Like the original edition, it’s written for folks who want a deeper look into the industry and it’s a perfect textbook to use not only in a high school level but also academic. Two new chapters–”Shesha and the Manga Industry Face a Midlife Crisis” and “Japanese Comedy: Entertainment Powerhouse Yoshimoto Kogyo Shaken by Scandal”– fill in the years between this edition and last. For the other chapters, addendums and what’s happening now are added to reveal whether or not projects like the Cool Japan strategy works.

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PIXAR’s Onward and Upwards Ho!

16 Mar

Image result for onward posterBy Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Spoiler Alert

Fans of TSR’s Dungeons and Dragons will certainly get a kick out of Disney*PIXAR’S Onward. Not only are all the references straight out of the monster manual, I acknowledge the acquisition from Wizards of the Coast–but they are not the true creators of this role playing game system. After saving this property from TSR’s failing infrastructure, they simply fixed it up. That being said, the world building and revolution that creators Dan Scanlon, Jason Headley and Keith Bunin crafted up is one I’d love to revisit!

Once upon a time, in a world far, far away was a world of magic. Sadly, it disappeared in favour of technological progress. Apparently it took place faster than anyone can realize–perhaps the only failing of this film–and pretty soon fairies, dwarves, elves, centaurs and many more had to embrace change. If they don’t stay progressive, any species I have not mentioned will be left behind. Onward is hardly subtle in this theme of forgetting the fast, and it establishes how this realm has become much like human society, dependent on technology to get by.

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Richard Bell’s Brotherhood is Coming to The Rio Mar 14th

10 Mar

Screening at The Rio on March 14th with writer/director Richard Bell, composer William Rowson and star Brendan Fletcher (The Revenant) in attendance.

1660 E Broadway
Vancouver, BC

Coming to iTunes at end of month.

Canadian filmmaker Richard Bell‘s tale of survival is sombre and evocative. His movie set in a not-so innocent age in the early 20th century shows what a Brotherhood truly entails. Based on the real-life incident that occurred in Balsam Lake, Ontario in 1926, one ill-fated trip with far too many people in one canoe across the lake to gather supplies took a turn for the worst. High winds capsized the transport, and much like the Titanic, some took their chances in the cold waters (swimming to shore) and others clung on for dear life until only a few remained.

Creating the drama was tough. Without a strong plot, I thought I’d be watching a dreamy period piece about training the next generation of boys to be the best they can be. The hope is that one may become the next David Currie–recipient of the Victoria Cross (the highest award for gallantry in the face of the enemy). With this film, it’s more about how each man have to face his own fear and Nature. The camp leaders think the generation growing up is weak and this sojourn will toughen them up. The context is certainly foreshadowed. Bell provides all the key bits of narrative through flashbacks which recount the better days, the earlier days until the night of.

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