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The Buzz About Lyle, Lyle Crocodile is Wonderful

6 Dec

Currently Available on Digital

Lyle, Lyle Crocodile is one of this year’s better comic strip/children’s storybook adaptations to grace the movie screen. After a different effort by another studio with a certain comic strip, Marmaduke did not sit. If people missed catching this flick because of the limited screenings, then they can thank Sony for the digital edition that’s now available.

Alternatively, the home video release is next week; the extras that come with it will certainly get me dancing and perhaps singing to Broadway too. I loved the musical presentation, and I’m eager to see music videos and featurettes to detail the production. On the list are:

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Just How Familiar Can Disney’s Strange World Get?

4 Dec

Strange World PosterSpoiler Alert

Disney Animation Studio‘s Strange World is visually gorgeous, but something is missing to make it a film worth remembering. I believe that’s because it’s not as true to those dime novels using ancient mythology to define where the adventure is at. Some pulps involve taking adventage of the era’s current interest in some archaeological dig or is simply high fantasy. Other publications offer sci-fi adventure.

Unfortunately, the Jules Verne influence in this motion film was not to my liking becuase the trailers suggested an Edgar Rice Burroughs direction. Had I been able to yell at the top of my lungs like Tarzan, I’d be happy. But instead, what we have here is a story about Searcher Clade (Jake Gyllenhaal) ecstatic about discovering an energy-producing plant, and Jaeger, his father (Dennis Quaid), has gone off the deep end. Well, sort of. The elder believes there’s more to find in the unexplored regions of this world. But without any acknowledgment about why they like to explore, part of this film’s concept falls on deaf ears.

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More Punk Than Just A Death of a Rockstar

2 Dec

Death of a RockstarAvailable to view on Roku and Tubi
DVD, Bluray and Soundtrack can be purchased through the official eBay store.

Röckët Stähr’s Death of a Rockstar has redefined what a concept album can look like as an animated movie experience. There’s honestly not enough material in this specific subgenre for fans to enjoy (the other is Pink Floyd’s The Wall and Metalocalypse: The Doomstar Requiem), and I love them all! The throwback animation style may not be for everyone, and I find parts of it very nostalgic. It felt like watching a Fleischer Studios cartoon with classic rock and roll music added on top.

Here, we’re presented with a story about the fate of a four-armed frontman (Stähr) as his show comes to a finale. After this band delivers a rousing performance to a packed house, someone in the crowd fires a gun, and the title card is displayed–he’s presumably killed. As this dying musician vibes back to his rise, what’s shown shows his success didn’t come easy. Also, there are even some moments which remind me of Nelvana’s Rock n’ Rule, as this star sings his heart away. One detail I love is the lyrics rendering in real time like a karaoke video! Usually, this option is rarely offered until a work gets offered as a sing-along to an anniversary celebration.

What we hear are songs recounting his life. The flashbacks include his creation, which is almost straight out of Frankenstein. He’s created by a mad scientist, Creigh A. Tor whose goal is to spur a movement to free the world from C. Czar’s oppressive regime. Röcky’s birth is no different from any other creation myth, and he’s lucky to not live an existence in excess. In regard to what he learns and expresses via song deserves attention.
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A Fond Look Back at REVIVAL69: The Concert That Rocked the World

30 Nov

REVIVAL69

Opens in Select Cinemas across Canada beginning Dec 16, 2022
See Below for British Columbia Screenings
* Mild Spoiler Alert

‘Twas the summer of 69, and while many remember Woodstock as the event that transformed music, there were others, namely Toronto Rock and Roll Revival, where locals praised it as the “…the best show of my life.” The new documentary REVIVAL69: The Concert That Rocked the World by Director Ron Chapman looks at how the idea got started, and all the troubles that went with staging such a production.

I can’t help but wonder if a very young Bryan Adams was at this Canadian show to get inspired to play his six-string till his fingers bled. As for how this film can influence not only his destiny but also those who were there–including Geddy Lee, only time will tell. This frontman of RUSH was interviewed about how this concert changed him. Although some performers had trepidation about being here, they were ready and willing. Others who weren’t too sure took convincing. And as for John Lennon, this event showed to the world he’s “quit” The Beatles in a not so official way. But for him to offer a different style of performance theatre wasn’t without its hurdles either. The backstory is quite compelling, and I was glued to this subplot more than the other narratives.

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Ainbo: Spirit of the Amazon is Finally in North America!

30 Nov

Ainbo: Spirit of the Amazon is finally here in North America, on home video, courtesy of Shout! Kids. I’ve looked at this movie a while back (review link), and what I offer is a quick look at the bonus material that’s included in the DVD release:

From the Press Release:

AINBO: SPIRIT OF THE AMAZON is an inspiring fantasy movie adventure of a young heroine and her thrilling journey to save the endangered Amazon rainforest. Directed by Jose Zelada and Richard Claus (The Little Vampire and The Thief Lord) with a Peruvian-Dutch co-production among Tunche Films (Lima) and Cool Beans (Amsterdam), AINBO: SPIRIT OF THE AMAZON is a strikingly visual and colorful animated movie bolstered by vibrant storytelling, a strong young female lead character, fascinating folklores, and the relevant theme of deforestation and environmental conservation.

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