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Korea’s K-Pop “Treasure” is Coming to Japan March 31st

18 Feb

Release date: March 31, 2021

Korea’s hottest boy band is preparing for a Japanese language debut!

In 2020 they dominated the rookie category at many awards ceremonies, including the Mnet Asian Music Awards, and in order to grow, they must blow up other markets. Feb 14th saw the release of their song “Beautiful” in another language, and it’s a hit! As a follow-up, they will release the album “The First Step: Treasure Effect,” March 31st!

This release will be the fourth consecutive work in their THE FIRST STEP series of releases that has already achieved over 1 million sales since the release of “Chapter One” in Korea in August 2020. The album will include the Japanese version of “Beautiful” and hits such as “Boy,” “I Love You,” “MMM” and “My Treasure,” with all 13 tracks on the album sung in Japanese. A Blu-ray/DVD is also planned, featuring music videos for the Japanese versions for the very first time.

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Video

From Art to Music with Millennium Parade’s Debut Album!

12 Feb

Image result for Millennium parade

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Not everyone will know of Millennium Parade, an arts collective from Japan whose music can’t be easily pigeon-holed. They are led by Daiki Tsuneta, frontman of J-Pop band King Gnu, and can be categorized as New Wave or Trip Hop. The debut self-titled album is a fresh exhilarating experience for me, and their sound is similar to but not quite like the sound from the virtual band’s Gorillaz. But anime fans will know them because they’re the composers of the opening song, “Fly with Me” for Netflix’s Ghost in the Shell: SAC 2045.

This work draws from Japanese folklore, and this supernatural world has modern tonality embedded in the lyrics. The songs take ideas from Hyakki Yagyo – The Night of One Hundred Demons and transform the images, stories and lore from this Asiatic world into evocative melodies that’s both a meditative and a clubbing experience. On the cover, a “Tezutsu Hanabi” (the oldest form of Japanese fireworks, encased in bamboo and held by hand) which was traditionally used to protect from evil spirits, and was also used to pray for a good harvest, is held by Ebisu (one of the 7 Gods of Fortune).

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VFFOnline: Navigating Nobuhiko Ōbayashi’s Labyrinth of Cinema

8 Feb

Labyrinth of Cinema (2019) poster.jpgBy Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Streaming Online
at the Victoria Film Festival
Get your pass here.
All films begin Feb 5th, 2021

Note: Geo-locked to residents in British Columbia

Spoiler Alert

Nobuhiko Ōbayashi‘s Labyrinth of Cinema is not only a tribute to the Golden Age of Hollywood but also an anti-war film. The many genres this era introduced helped define the shape of entertainment still to come, and its fondly honoured. We see a bit of everything in this film, from animation to comedy to sci-fi, and there’s even a splash of horror offered after a few musical moments. The best bits are with the romances, though.

The films of today are a lot more sophisticated in terms of realism. This filmmaker went old school to make this movie, and he wanted his performers to overact. They are in on the joke. He uses those techniques to emphasize why the modern (nuclear) age is terrible. The realism is just that, and the fiction is in technicolour. Unlike Ishirō Honda‘s intent in Gojira (1954), this work makes a different commentary about why going to war is bad (from the eyes of one side in the conflict). Also included is the fear of where humanity is headed–whether or not any future conflicts to come will destroy humanity. Ultimately, his goal is to show us why engaging in the art of war (and not in the Sun Tzu sense) is bad.

Ōbayashi makes use of humour to hammer in the point. He also broke a lot of rules from movie making 101 when he was in post-production, namely the editing of Labyrinth of Cinema. I was taught to avoid jump cuts in my newsroom videos, but he’s gratuitous in using this technique. The plot here is non-linear, and he purposely micro-budgeted the set design in some of this film’s best romantic moments to make it picturesque, like it’s from a painting. More green screen sets were used to distinguish the many realities explored. My guess is that the only proper place was a movie theatre and everything else was digitally created.

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Faster Than the Speed of Light is Earwig & the Witch’s Home Video Release Date!

25 Jan

GKIDS & Shout! Factory

Home Video:
April 6, 2020 

Hot after its limited screening in select theatres worldwide in early Feb, Studio Ghibli’s Earwig and the Witch will hit digital next month, March 23, for other regions. This is the date to circle for this highly anticipated release for video streamers.

The home video release, set to arrive two weeks after, will be. offered in both a Limited Edition Steelbook™ and a Blu-ray+DVD combo, and the extra features being offered are as follows:

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