Tag Archives: Drama

A Look Back & What’s Next for The Loud House & Casagrandes Continuing January!

8 Jan

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Fans of The Loud House will be glad to know the next new set of episodes will begin late January. This series is one of those guilty pleasures to enjoy watching late at night. The Casagrandes is a spin-off that’s showing a lot of promise and both will continue month and I can’t wait! Loud House has new episodes starting Jan 25th and Casagrandes on Jan 11th. As much as I hoped for Nickelodeon to offer a holiday special, it did not happen.

Both grew on me as I regularly have YTV playing in the background late at night and this two-hour block helped those long nights feel shorter. Both series offer better humour and is a better take on examining having a large family than the Cheaper by the Dozen. Here, Lincoln is a 10-year-old boy with a lot to figure out in a household with ten sisters. My favourite episodes are those where he has one of three people to turn to for “manly” advice. There’s his father, best friend Clyde (who is the adopted son of an interracial gay married couple) and “Pop Pop” (the grandfather).

Having John DiMaggio around as Bud, the grouchy neighbour is just perfect. He’s not really like a second grandparent, but the holiday episode explaining why he is always grouchy is the closest thing we can have to a How I saved the Grinch episode. Although typecast (he was Bender from Futurama), I’m loving it!

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The Stakes were Never Big in Netflix’s Dracula

6 Jan

Image result for bbc dracula posterBy Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Just how many reimaginings of Bram Stoker’s Dracula do we need? Let me count the works from this century: there’s at least a dozen—Untold, Dark Prince, and Reborn are perhaps the closest they can get to the book’s lore. The rest sticks around even after being “killed” so he remains a threat to humanity.

Mark Gatiss (Sherlock) and Steven Moffat (Doctor Who) developed this latest take and it’s a curious mix of period drama and Hammer style horror. This three-part series has each episode nearly movie length. Like the novel, it begins conveniently enough with Jonathan Harker (John Heffernan) visiting the Count (Claes Bang) and Mina (Morfydd Clark) swearing her eternal love. The nobleman has other plans and his lust for both the male and female gender goes nowhere fast. Either he’s too decrepit to get off, or those tones brought down for Netflix’s broadcasting standards.

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Every Breath You Take with Funan, on Home Video Dec 3rd!

2 Dec

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Release Date:
Dec 3rd, 2019

GKIDS & Shout! Factory

Funan is a deeply personal look into the life and times of Chou (voiced by Bérénice Bejo) when she faces more than a life separated from her family. Her story is based on writer/director Denis Do’s own experiences. It’s mostly about the stories his mother passed down. Her trials of wanting to reunite with her loved ones following the Cambodian uprising of the Khmer Rouge regime was difficult. This switch of power took place in April 1975 and lasted till 79.

Do hits a home run with the screenplay. The dialogue about how this new political party supposedly can do good seems brash. I see it as a conflict of one man’s ideals versus another’s in a matter of national pride. The English dub is reasonably well done, even though I switched to watching the French language version; translations can only go far and I wanted to see this work as it was originally intended. As I watched this heartbreaking movie, I can’t help but think the lyrics to The Police’s song, “Every Breath You Take” take on new meaning here. The story of love, loss and hope is every bit as powerful as the song because, quite literally, the new regime’s eyes are everywhere and ready to strike (for all the wrong reasons).

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Buñuel in the Labrynth of the Turtles

20 Nov

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Released:
Nov 12, 2019

GKIDS & Shout! Factory

Mild Spoiler Alert

Ask any modern art critic what this medium is about, and you’ll get a variety of answers. It’s either a social call to arms, a reflection of life or nothing at all. Sometimes it’s easier to understand a talent’s work by examining the life and times. Anyone studying early film is likely to come across the works of Luis Buñuel. The animated look of this auteur by Salvador Simó is a captivating analysis and one I had to view a few times.

Buñuel in the Labyrinth of the Turtles concerns his attempt into the making Las Hurdes (Land Without Bread). The filmmaker was near broke because his last movie (L’Age d’Or) branded him a heretic and he needed a new investor if he’s examining an impoverished region with a higher than usual adoption rate. Also, the medieval conditions he saw was something he had to express (through surreal imagery) to the world through his own profound use of visual shock therapy.

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