Tag Archives: Documentary

Examining the Juke Joints with Danger Boys: Punks in Osaka, a Preview

15 Aug

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By Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

Murahachibu and Zuno Keisatsu are two Japanese punk rock bands who helped form the punk rock music scene during the 70’s. Although the former shifted focus, and the other remain, to consider how their sound evolved to what is heard today, trying to discover what works and exists to music listeners interested in this part of the world has been described by some music journalists as hard to penetrate. The live music scene, according to a 2014 article in the Japan Times, is “notoriously difficult to penetrate. What’s there is said to be tucked away in the basements and upper floors of anonymous buildings, often in seedy parts of town, where the neighbours will be less likely to raise complaints against noise and loitering, with websites that update schedules only a few days before the actual events and that rarely link to any of the artists performing, live venues are like a hidden world open only to those who know the secret handshake.”

Seattle-based pseudo-punk band Tennis Pro entered this realm when they hit the road less travelled to gain recognition in their documentary Big in Japan (2014), but to penetrate Japan’s current scene within a world buried in another one is just as tough to uncover. Enter Danger Boys: Punks in Osaka, a documentary by Nick Romi (director) which is set to release December 11, 2017. This video can be pre-ordered at foreverunholystore.bigcartel.com and early birds will get a limited edition poster for a fantastic price of $10. This video will also be available on select streaming video services on the same day.

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[Trailer] May the Force Be with “Mom and Me” Beginning May 5th

23 Apr

By Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

Mother’s Day is not until May 14th, and for some families, they go all out to pay tribute to the matriarch of the family. Some moms may do what they do raising their children out of how they were raised and others only want the best. Mother and Me is a very moving documentary by writer-director Ken Wardrop and it will see its premiere May 5th in theaters and on VOD.

The Hollywood Reporter describes this product as “nicely judged mirror on life and feelings,” and FilmIreland says this film “captures the universal experience of motherly love perfectly.”

From Liberty Talk Radio, Joe Cristiano explores how the manliest men from the manliest state in the Union, Oklahoma, feel about their mothers. He gets them to call in to talk about their relationship with their moms on air, and in what this documentary shows, there’s bound to be surprises that will leave you feeling warm and fuzzy inside.

Does the Bare Necessities Reveal a Grizzly Truth? – An Interview with Tom Reissmann

30 Mar

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By Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

Available to view on demand on Vimeo
starting March 30th. 2017

Whether created by animation or live-action, the great bear has come to symbolize one of several things. As a symbol of strength and courage — or perhaps a constellation you see on the night sky — this animal’s importance to nature and in a grander a cosmic scheme must never go unnoticed. In the cartoon world, we have beloved characters like Yogi the Bear (created by Hanna-Barbera in 1958) and Baloo from Disney’s The Jungle Book (1967) / Tail Spin (1990). Jump ahead a little more than a decade, this studio made Brother Bear (2003) which looked at how man should respect nature and understand tolerance. The main character, Kenai, was transformed into a bear, and had to learn for himself why this animal is so revered within his tribe. In Haida culture, this gentle creature is known as the “Elder Kinsman” and is treated as a noble guest instead of a thief because it stole from the river, which also provided sustenance to the locals.

If only the people who hunt them can treat and think of these gentle creatures the same way. In this documentary, the hunters sort of say they do, but that’s for the viewer to decide. I was offered the opportunity to get a sneak preview of a very thought-provoking and insightful program. It looks the role this animal and where it stands within different organizations. From the hunter’s perspective to governmental and First Nations, everybody has an opinion on a hot political topic in this year’s British Columbia election: to finally ban grizzly bear hunting. They are sought after more often as trophys these days, which is sad. For those just wanting to take a snapshot, it it even helpful to the local economy? A lot is said to view the pros and cons of both, and this film nicely walks the fine line than lean towards a specific stance.

In Africa, the lion is said to be on top of the food chain. In North America, it is the bear. Destroy the alpha, and there will be problems. This fact and many other details are revealed in this documentary that’s now available online to view. And writer/director Tom Reissmann had other facts to reveal about the making of this film:

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Do You Dream in Color? awakens today onto VOD!

10 Feb

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By Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)Do You Dream in Colour

Do You Dream in Colour is a very inspiring documentary about four blind teenagers challenging the norm, and it is set to arrive on Video on Demand outlets like iTunes today.

These youths show they can make great accomplishments in their life. Connor wants to become a sponsored skateboarder, Nick and his band perform live, Sarah desires to study abroad (her goal is to study Spanish in Portugal) and Carina to graduate high school. The latter is tough when not all institutions have the material needed for the disabled, especially the blind, to study with their peers. The material is out there, but to say a school has it is another question.
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