Tag Archives: Documentary

Bullied: You Are Not Alone, A Documentary Review

10 Feb

Available On Demand on Select Streaming Platforms

Coming to Tubi on Feb 12, 2021

For updates, please visit their Facebook page.

Bullying in any form is socially unacceptable, and the nerd/geek community is often the target because we continue to love stuff that other people have outgrown. Filmmaker Thomas Keith‘s documentary Bullied: You Are Not Alone examines the nature of the beast, and I feel it’s a must for every high school curriculum to show in Social Studies early on, and discuss, so every student can perhaps have an easier time in education instead of doing something they may regret later, or simply drop out of society (and life).

This subject really should be relabelled History, but I digress. This work not only brilliantly shows us how bullying behaviour developed over time, from the cave man days to where we’re at in the 21st Century with cyber-bullying (on any social media platform)–especially concerning the statistics revealed about Americans. Correcting this universal problem is not easy and in what makes this work special is that it shows us possible solutions to change this troubling aspect of society.

The stories we see here aren’t about those facing a challenging social life in school. There’s also workplace bullying and how people treat others when one may have a disability or other characteristic (like race) the other doesn’t like.

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VFFOnline: Are We Doomed by Becoming an iHuman?

6 Feb

Image result for ihuman posterBy Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Streaming Online
at the Victoria Film Festival
Get your pass here to view beginning Feb 5th, 2021

Note: Available to view for residents in British Columbia

To become an iHuman is less about what applications can benefit from the use of artificial intelligence, but more on how that information is used. There are pros and cons, as everyone knows, to giving birth to a SkyNet from the movie Terminator. Is the human species doomed? Thankfully, not yet.

This documentary directed by Tonje Hessen Schei is very telling. It’s scary when considering it lists who is interested in making use of machine guided decisions. And it’s not with monitoring the habits of smartphone and computer users worldwide.

We already know about the ways Google and Facebook are using your data. The latter tracks your likes and dislikes. Even on Amazon’s mass marketplace, where you can buy anything (it’s not just about books), the website knows your tastes; when you flip to its video streaming service, the television programs you may not have heard of are on top of the recommended list!

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VFFOnline: What’s in the Jukebox? An American Dream Made in Quebec

6 Feb

Image result for Jukebox: The American Dream, Made in QuébecBy Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Streaming Online
at the Victoria Film Festival
Get your pass here to view beginning Feb 5th, 2021

Note: Available to view for residents in British Columbia

C’mon baby, let’s do the twist with Denis Pantis, the son of a Greek immigrant who took Montreal’s music scene by storm back in the 60s. His presence was everywhere. From producing to finding new talent, the names he discovered said something not only for the times but also for his pocketbook.

Jukebox: An American Dream Made in Quebec is a wicked look into the past, with a personality in its presentation to boot. Directors Éric Ruel and Guylaine Maroist expertly delves into Pantis’ influence throughout his many ventures, and although he never wanted to be a musician himself, he had the talent to promote others and turn hits from elsewhere into francophone delights.

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VFFOnline 2021: How to Give Life Back to Coral Ghosts

2 Feb

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Streaming Online
at the Victoria Film Festival
Get your pass here to view beginning Feb 5th, 2021

Note: Available to view for residents in British Columbia

Coral Ghosts mixes up two ideas, the need to reverse the damaging effects of climate change and preserve the past with still photography, into a rallying cry to reverse the damage done to the reefs around the world. This uphill challenge is tough. Marine biologist Dr. Thomas J. Goreau wants to save the life of more than one ocean. It’s not about Bikini Atoll, where this documentary begins. In an article on The Guardian, Eleanor Ainge Roy wrote, “Steve Palumbi, a professor in marine sciences at the university, said the effects of radiation poisoning on ocean life have never been studied in-depth, and his team’s initial research suggests it is ‘remarkably resilient’.”

Spongebob Squarepants would cry if he saw this work by Andrew Nisker. Not everyone recognizes the tie in of the fictional cartoon ocean world to real life. As for why some marine creatures survived the devastation (and didn’t mutate) while others haven’t is a mystery when the island was recently researched. I personally think it’s because some species returned many decades later after the amount of radiation in the bottom of the sea near these Marshall Islands levelled, even though it’ll still harm human life.

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