Tag Archives: Interview

The Order (on Season 2 & Origins), An Interview w Dennis Heaton

28 Aug

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

With a simple teaser from Netflix back in March of when season two of the horror drama The Order will arrive, coming soon is not enough. Filming the series depends on availability of when cast and crew can be at the University of British Columbia between semesters (or during). When detailed information was lacking at their presentation at the San Diego Comic Con last month, I was glad I spoke with Dennis Heaton, the creator, beforehand.

Like Ghost Wars, The Order is a product of everything he’s enjoyed as a fan of horror and comedy. The latter is more of his baby than previous works. To speak to him ahead of any current promotion (to which Netflix has been quiet lately) is to show I’m enjoying the series, and I binged the series at least three times. I spoke to him about the series and hoped to maybe get an idea or two about what’s he has in mind happen for season two.

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Kre8ing with Ezra Istiroti, An Interview

8 Aug

Ezra Istiroti is more than a typical digital media/ advertising content creator. With a panache for sound design and a methodology, firms like McDonald’s and The Coca-Cola Co. in Mexico City will hire him to design their ad campaigns. He’s also the type of easy going and motivational talent people want to hear from.

After graduating from the Vancouver Film School and running his own firm to develop commercials and branding for other firms operations like BC Place, he’s back with the said institution and now teaching. For people who have been to the World of Wonders event during the 
Calgary Stampede early this decade will now know he’s the creative mind behind the design of that interactive installation. He’s also done the jumbotron animations for the Ottawa Fury, 67’s and RedBlacks. It’s rare to know who made that stuff, and now the opportunity exists to say hi, thanks for your amazing work in the past and also learn from him in how it’s made, and do it yourself!

Istiroti is coming to Victoria, BC to lead a workshop to teach to newcomers interested in film, theatre or arts on what they can do with digital media with a three-day intensive Stop Motion animation program starting August 12th (click link to register).

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On Shelagh McLeod, Filming, Writing the Future with Astronaut, An Interview

25 Jul

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

In theatres July 26th
Please check local listings

Not everyone would have been able to attend the North American premiere of Astronaut last week at the 2019 Fantasia Film Festival. Fortunately, hot off the heels of this event are theatrical showings starting tomorrow in major cities of this very fine film. The themes writer/director Shelagh McLeod explores are many, and to balance between the concept of sending an elder into outer space to the challenges he faced meant figuring out what the film must focus on. 

For readers not aware of your work, could you please introduce yourself and the work you feel you are best known for.

My name is Shelagh McLeod, I was born in Vancouver. My family left Canada when I was six years old and we moved to the UK. I have been an actor for nearly forty years and have worked all over the world. I guess my career really started with a TV Film called ‘Cream in my Coffee’ written by the great, late, legendary writer–Dennis Potter. I played the younger version of Dame Peggy Ashcroft’s character–Jean. I did theatre, film and many TV series. One of which was Peak Practice—a lovely heartwarming series that went on for many seasons.

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[From the Archives] From Baseline to Big in Japan – Tennis Pro, The Interview

17 Jun

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Originally published in 2015 on Vivascene
This interview I conducted has since disappeared.
Revised edition June 2019

Ask any musician, and you will hear that breaking into the music scene is tough. To get the recognition that matters is even harder. Seattle-based band, Tennis Pro, found that they had to take their act to another country because in the good ol’ United States of America, their local music scene was quite stagnant.

“I think that Seattle, after the 90’s explosion [with grunge music], has struggled to find its identity musically,” said drummer Sean Lowry. In his opinion, the city had fallen into a melancholy folk-rock wasteland.

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