Tag Archives: Interview

On Stacey Tenenbaum’s Scrap, Tricks for Reuse and Where to Watch It.

21 Oct

Stacey TenenbaumRio Theatre
Vancouver, BC
Saturday Oct. 22 3:15pm

Stacey Tenenbaum has been touring Canada during Waste Reduction Week, and attending special screenings of her documentary, Scrap, to answer those questions about what it means to not only recycle, but also explain humanity’s relationship with the objects made long ago. It’s not about reusing what’s found in a scrapyard for a movie, like Mad Max: Fury Road, or finding new uses of smaller industrial objects, like steampunk cosplay. I’m sure people scour the junkyards for those antiques needed when a film or tv show requires something from a bygone age when it can’t be found in an antique store.

But there’s more to this movie than meets the eye in terms of how old junk is reused. They have longetivity to them, and that’s one key thing to remember. Also, some of these items do more than bring out feelings of nostalgia. Also, there’s an intrinsic beauty not everyone can recognise. Whether it’s to be used in installation art or for residing in, I adored every careful possibility that’s been put into this work.

I feel what this filmmaker offers is very meditative, and I had an opportunity to correspond with her about this work:

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An Interview with Sandy King of Storm King Comics

15 Oct

Sandy King of Storm King Comics

Sandy King is certainly not overshadowed by her husband and filmmaker extraordinaire, John Carpenter. Together, they are a powerhouse couple who’s out to make a unique stamp in not only comicbookdom but also cinema. She’s not only co-producer of her husbands many works, but also the first woman founder of the comic book publishing company, Storm King Comics . Before this shift to publishing, she worked with legends of cinema like Francis Ford Coppola and Michael Mann to name a few.

“I feel like I’ve been lucky enough to work with amazing auteur filmmakers in a wide array of genres,” said King. “In the animation world, I worked for Lewis Hall and Carlos Gutierrez on a film called ‘Anti-Matter,’ which won the first Student Academy Award. With John, I’ve done some pretty classic horror films, including ‘They Live,’ which I think was an important film for our times.”

There are not many filmmakers today who can say they’ve made dramas (Killing of a Chinese Bookie with Cassavetes), comedies (16 Candles with John Hughes), westerns (The Long Riders with Walter Hill), animated films and horror movies.

This company got its start when Thomas Ian Griffith came to her and John with an idea. They spent two years learning the ropes, and talking to those who know the industry before getting anything printed. “The result was our first book, John Carpenter’s Asylum . It won awards; it was fun to do, and we’ve never stopped. Probably our most popular title is the annual anthology we publish every October, John Carpenter’s Tales for a HalloweeNight,” said King.

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When Three Little Wishes Isn’t Enough. An Interview with Paul Cornell and Steve Yeowell.

18 Aug

Paul Cornell, Author of Three LIttle Wishes

Legendary Comics

Three Little Wishes is a hilarious graphic novel which subverts the traditional idea of about fulfilling one’s grandest desires. Sometimes, the person finding magic in the bottle doesn’t want that, and in what he or she wants may well be something nicer. I don’t want to say too much, but as for what caught my attention is that we don’t get a tale out of Arabian Knights, and the creators Paul Cornell and Steve Yeowell crafted a beautiful tale that I often don’t see in this subgenre.

It’s a very British work, and the nuances that come with it was enough for me!

Can you please introduce yourselves? That is, what was that break that got you into working in the comics industry?

Paul Cornell (Pictured left): Both times it was through Doctor Who–I got into writing British comics because I knew the editor of Doctor Who Magazine and I said I wanted to write. John Freeman gave me a strip and taught me the basics, And many years later, after he saw my work, Mark Miller emailed me asking if I would like to write for Marvel Comics. It’s a career route that any young creator can easily follow. I recommend it to anybody.

Steve Yeowell (Pictured Right): My first professional job was working with Grant Morrison on a Japanese toy tie in, Zoids, for Marvel UK. And from there, I went to 2008 A.D. From then on, it was with various American projects–Skrull Kill Krew, Starman, The Invisibles. I worked with lots of American writers. I’ve even worked with Miller a couple of times, and James Robinson. My latest is with Paul on Three Little Wishes, a rom com graphic novel.

Steve Yeowell

One thing I’ve always wondered about–what’s the difference between British comics and American comics?

PC: There aren’t many of them left now, but most of them were anthology titles. So you’re dealing with short strips. And it gives you great discipline. With 2000 AD, you have to be in and out in five pages. What would you say, Steve?

SY: I think it’s a difference in dynamic because of the format. It means the story is much more concise. You have to get to the point quickly.

With Three Little Wishes, how did the idea come about?

PC: Well, the idea came about because I was sitting with my agent one day, and her husband is a contract lawyer. And I had in my head an idea for a book about granting wishes. I thought who would be the worst possible person for a fairy, interested in tricking humans with the fine detail of wishes, to encounter? A contract lawyer!

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Ancient Explorers: The Lost City of Peru and The Man Behind the Legend Quest

10 Aug

Omar Mara

People who attended SDCC a few weekends ago had plenty to look at. Whether that’d be comic books or the latest news on movies, there’s even something for the jungle explorer! Ancient Explorers: The Lost City of Peru is novel – comic book hybrid about two best friends on the quest for adventure! Together with two archaeologists, they discover an ancient map and a compass that’ll point them to more than adventure, but also self-discovery.

It’s now available across various platforms to read, and we at otakunoculture.com got a chance to talk to the author:

Could you please introduce yourself to readers unfamiliar with your work?

My name is Omar Mora. I am a writer, producer and actor from Puerto Rico who lives in Los Angeles. I have written two independent feature films; 30 Days with my brother and Inside the Circle. Both available on VOD. I have written a series of comics called The Unearthians. You can find my work at MorasProductions.com

What made you decide to create a hybrid written work with graphic novel elements? (and was it difficult to decide what parts of the narrative should be illustrated rather than described?)

When Covid came, so did the economy. Producing a comic is expensive, so the finances weren’t quite right. So we decided to do it as a hybrid. And to be honest it was the best decision. Because the design of the book along with the comic pages looks great and gives a special touch to the story. I am very happy with the final results.

It was not difficult to choose which pages were going to be comics. I usually chose pages that introduced a character, a very important aspect of the story, or fantasy elements that I knew would look amazing as art. I also wanted to choose pages that would help create intrigue in the story and create that suspense necessary for the reader to be engaged.

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[Fantasia 2020] More Than Just a Sneak Peak at José Luis Saturno’s La Melodía Torrencial

23 Jul

José Luis Saturno

Monsters and and Humans Shorts
July 23 at 9:00 PM at the Cinéma du Musée

In Fantasia’s 2022 list of animated shorts, not only did José Luis Saturno’s poster for La Melodía Torrencial catch my attention for its artistic design but also the trailer looked fabulous! The art design had a touch of Tim Burton’s design aesthetic which I adored, and I had to know more. I mentioned this film in my top animated picks list, and got a chance to see this short film ahead of its premiere.

This story about a rainmaker going by the name of Fluvio has a lot of layers tucked into its narrative. When a township sought him out to bring them rain to their arid community, what they get–some may say–was their just desserts. But there’s a lot more going on in Saturno’s latest work than meets the eye.

This filmmaker studied Film Animation at Concordia University in Montreal and started producing even before finishing his degree. He didn’t submit for film festivals until his third year in school, and instead of working for the big studios, he decided going independent was the way to go.

Thus, Enjambre Hexagonal was born. A few of their works can be found on YouTube, but to see them as they’re intended, on the big screen, is a must so the detail can be appreciated. He hires freelance artists as part of the staff to do this work, and the people on call include Yann Ben Alluch who does the storyboards and helps animate (“El mimo y la mariposa negra”). Robin Servant handles all the music and is the talent behind the sounds in La Melodía Torrencial. 

He said, “I never felt compelled to work in the industry from the bottom in the hopes of one day being hired as a director. I simply wanted to make films as quickly as possible.”

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