Tag Archives: Short Film

There’s no Shortage of Shorts at Fantasia 2020 on the Last Two Days…

1 Sep

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

If you haven’t checked out Fantasia’s many movie shorts, there’s not a lot of time left! A few works caught my eye late Monday night and they can not go unnoticed without some kind of mention.

This year’s virtual edition is great! I hope the producers will continue to offer some parts of this show online. Eventually, when the pandemic is over, some events will have to consider how to carry on going forward. Those used to waiting in line for entry to the theatre should still get that aspect of what a film festival represents. Those who have come to love just logging into a website and streaming the content to their big screen television shouldn’t be cut short either.

However this event (and any other) progresses will require time to tell, and either way, I think going online is perfect for all the shorts that are out there. Film Festivals who think they aren’t popular and put them in low seating arrangements are quite literally cutting themselves short! Fair play gets those filmmakers noticed. Of the shorts I’ve seen, the following are worth watching! They are listed in no particular order.

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Highlights from My First Fantasia

23 Aug

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Playing at Fantasia Digital Film Festival 2020 On Demand till Sept 2. Buy your virtual ticket here.

Fantasia Film Festival may seem short with feature length animated works this year because one title was pulled. My response is to check out the My First Fantasia Programme. There’s more than enough pieces to sate anyone’s appetite! Plus, the other packaged presentations include mini tales of fantasy, sci-fi and experimental works. There’s a mini festival within a festival if you spend your time exploring the talents featured here.

Realistically, the Annecy International Animation Film Festival is the event for fans of this medium. When my love for this genre outweighs Asian works, I had to do a marathon run of this particular set of works this weekend. I’m particularly interested with seeing what emerging talents from around the world are offering. Some are certainly ready to be noticed by Studio Ghibli, Studio Canal, Cartoon Saloon, or even PIXAR.

A few shorts are repeated in the other themed sets; they only help reinforce the concept being presented. Some are animated in CGI, others are hand drawn, a few are stop motion and the rest use a blend of other techniques—which include clay, Adobe Animation (formerly Flash) or otherwise. They are all used to great effect to convey a sense of wonder, whimsy or surreal.

This list highlights the pieces which I found the most engaging from each themed package:

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Fantasia Digital Fest 2020 – The Vintage Tempest’s Top Picks!

19 Aug

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

The 2020 Fantasia International Film Festival is taking place online! It will run from August 20th to Sept 2nd, and the producers behind this event worked hard with Festival Scope and Shift72 to ensure that for Canadian audiences, they will have an experience to remember.

According to Fantasia’s FAQ: Unfortunately, we can’t make new films available across the world without potentially hurting their future distribution and exhibition options, which is a key concern to us. The only exception is Troma’s latest, an interpretation of William Shakespeare’s The Tempest, which will be available to audiences in Canada and the United States.

Signing up to this event is easy. All anyone has to do is to visit Fantasia’s website and make an account. Options exist to make a wish list, and tickets can be pre-purchased early for those shows with a set time of broadcast, or viewed at leisure, beginning August 20th. The showtimes advertised on Fantasia’s PDF Guide and social media platforms and the like are listed in Eastern Standard Time.

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The NFB Defines The Physics of Sorrow

19 Sep

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Georgi Gospodinov’s “The Physics of Sorrow” is animated by Theodore Ushev (best known for Blind Yaysha), and this director/artist’s approach is hauntingly beautiful. It made its premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival (Sept 5-15, 2019) and is produced by the National Film Board of Canada. I suspect this animated short will have a few more cinematic screenings before becoming available online. I recommend the big screen version because of the artistry put into the work.

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