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There’s No Need for a Hellboy Reboot

8 May

By Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

Studios desiring a higher profit margin is most likely behind the reason Hellboy is being rebooted. I can not and will not accept anyone other than Ron Perlman to play the title role. When news broke Monday night about this Columbia Pictures distributed film getting a second life, please pardon my french, “F*** No!” Since the business heads could not come eye-to-eye with Guillermo del Toro‘s pitch and the production costs involved (yes, he’s famously known to go over budget), don’t stab this director in the back by saying we’ll simply reboot it with Neil Marshall helming the second incarnation like this series can be changed around like Doctor Who.

Marshall has modest hits like Descent and Dog Soldiers to show he has the chops, but I do not think he has the comic book cred to pull off an R-rated version. Whether that means more blood or scarier content, that remains to be seen as no proper word is given if he will also be part of the script-writing team.

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Resurrecting Familiar Tropes in The Mummy (2017) Second Trailer

13 Apr

By Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

After looking at the second The Mummy trailer multiple times in the past few weeks since its release, I still can not shake the feeling I have seen this story before. I’m not as excited as the first trailer has led me to believe.

While I plan to see how this reboot helmed by director Alex Kurtzman and written by Jon Spaihts and Christopher McQuarrie pans out, I am setting the bar low because of what I have seen in past and present products about bringing dead Egyptians back to life. King Tut must be rolling in his grave; A film about his haunted tomb sounds like a better idea than where the creators are going with this film. At the same time, I’m left wondering if all the studio producers wanted is to take the best from what Stephen Sommers created from his trilogy and make simple creative changes to make this reboot seem original. After reading the fourth issue of Hammer Comic’s The Mummy, I’m finding I’m liking their story better. At least cults and hungry devourers from the afterlife are involved than a secret agenda which Dr Jekyll (played by Russell Crowe) no doubt harbours.

Much like Rick O’Connell, Nick Morton (Tom Cruise) is a soldier fighting in a war, and after a building gets blown up, he stumbles across a tomb (actually, a prison) which he makes the mistake of disturbing. He may also have a past that connects him to the Mummy (Sofia Boutella). Jenny (Annabelle Wallis) is just as smart as Evie and has knowledge of Ancient Egypt’s lines of pharaonic successors. As revealed in the first trailer, birds come crashing upon the transport plane carrying the sarcophagus, and as for whether the corpse was awake to summon them, that’s a detail not revealed. Maybe someone has read from a book to awaken The Mummy and to cause the carrier to crash. Everyone should be dead, except for Morton, and Jenny provides all the back story that’s needed to get people interested in this film up to speed.

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LANtasy 2017 is Taking Place This Weekend in Victoria, BC, But Will I Go?

17 Mar

By Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

Pearkes Recreation Center
3100 Tillicum Rd
Victoria, BC

March 18-19, 2017

To attend LANtasy 2017 or not to get my game geek on is debatable. At home, I have my three game consoles and a huge collection of Chaosium and GURPs role playing books. I like the idea of playing games with folks with similar tastes as mine. But in what I’m discovering post- Emerald City Comicon (ECCC) is whether or not smaller events can live up to what I enjoy from the bigger shows. Here, I can seek out those rare bits of merchandise, chat with players about those lost games, namely Nephilim, or try tabletop card demos.

I like to browse and wander through a huge hall of exhibitors (I kept on wandering back to Steve Jackson Games at ECCC to view their merchandise) and talk to companies to learn about what’s coming for the “industry” the convention is representing. This Seattle-based show has a floor dedicated to all things gaming, feels more welcoming (the staff here are really helpful and nicer if I had to start making comparisons) and is spaced out. That is, rooms exist to locate games in (controlling noise levels is always important) than to stuff it all into one huge basketball court.

A few local video game developers, namely Codename Entertainment and Piranha Games, are attending and supposedly, they are giving a panel somewhere in the Pearkes Recreation Center. But I can not find further information in where panels are located. It’s not clearly defined when there’s no online map to consult.

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The Founder does not Flounder the History of McDonald’s

20 Jan

cezgbkauyaa20xxBy Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

The world can either love McDonald’s or hate this fast food franchise chain even more after watching The Founder.

Myself, I find myself in the position of thinking this company had a huge share of problems when Ray Kroc was in charge during this company’s heydays. The fictional version is wonderfully and perfectly played by Michael Keaton. He oozes sleaze and I kept on being reminded of Donald Trump. When Kroc saw the potential of what Dick (Nick Offerman) and Mac (John Carroll Lynch) McDonald — the true innovators — tiny operation could do: to provide fast food in a timely and tasty manner. Their expertise set the standards other operations now imitate and nobody can patent the assembly line process (If they could, I’m sure they’d be raking in the dough). Instead of having an expansive menu, they provided the basics and the people of San Bernardino, California loved it.

Kroc was a struggling travelling salesman working for a manufacturer of kitchen aids, Prince Castle. As the story introduces him trying to sell milkshake makers that can churn out eight of them at a time, nobody was interested. His shtick was to show them how progress has to be handled through efficiency. But his snide tactics had many a restaurateur closing the door on him. When a large order came from the McDonald’s operation, he drove all the way from Illinois (using route 66) to see what’s up. When he got there, he saw the potential of how the brother’s operation can become nation-wide.

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