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Fan Expo Vancouver 2018 Report

25 Oct

215d2-fanexpovancouverBy Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Anyone who enjoys reading comic books, meeting celebrities and shopping for geeky novelties will flock to events like Fan Expo Vancouver (FXV), no matter when or where it takes place. This year, they moved from their November slot to October mid-month, from Oct 12-14th and scaled it back. Those who have frequently been to this annual event noticed.

Instead of taking up two floors of the West Vancouver Convention Center, everything was packed into one space. As I have reported in previous articles, the East Building has SHUX, a closed to the public board game event. I could approach check-in and look yonder to know the layout was similar to FXV’s. And that’s to pack everything into one space instead of spreading it out. This event probably took up three-quarters of the main floor. On the map, the area dedicated to panels and sellers were smaller and I was glad to know I was not missing anything special. Attendees to this event were not here to shop, but rather play demos and new games; I could not spot card games like Magic the Gathering.

If I had to pick between two events the same weekend, my money is on Fan Expo.

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Silly Lucasarts, Star Wars: Resistance is for Kids

17 Oct
shawn

The views and opinions of this editorial are my own and do not reflect that of Otaku no Culture.

By Shawn Trommeshauser
(Dreaming in Digital)

Do not want.

I’m probably done with Disney’s Star Wars. The animated series, Rebels was great, but I’ve had major issues with the direction they’ve taken with the franchise as a whole. I have no interest in seeking out this show as the trailer just screamed ‘kids show catering to the kids starring kids’.

While that’s a perfectly acceptable approach, it’s just not what I’m looking for. Normally I’d give it a shot to see if I’m proven wrong, but nearly everything they’ve done with the series on screen and behind the camera has severely let me down and the previews for Resistance did nothing to interest me at all. Many episodes on, I still had no interest in watching. Sadly it’s looking like Star Wars just isn’t for me anymore.

I was originally avoiding Solo, but I was bored last week so I finally watched the first Star Wars film to fail. And despite some issues I have with it, it was still the most fun Star Wars film Disney made so far. It wasn’t full of epic, loved characters who were all completely depressed and beaten down by life. Seriously, who thought that a perpetually depressed Leia, a Luke that ran away from the world, a Han that gave up on the life he’d made, and the completely unexplained negation of the victories of the original movies were the formula for the return of Star Wars that the fans wanted to see?

Image result for star wars resistance

One of my biggest gripes was in how Disney wiped away the Expanded Universe [now called Legends – Ed]. When they bought Star Wars, they didn’t just buy films and books and copyrights. They bought the Star Wars Universe and the fans which go with it.

Star Wars is one of the very few creative properties that transcend the original presentation. And if we’re being honest, while they are VERY important, the Star Wars films are also a VERY small percentage of that universe. When they dropped the EU, they dropped the vast majority of what made Star Wars special as a franchise.

Sure they’re making money, but at this point, it’s like Apple. They used to be amazing. But now they’re coasting on their former reputation and the fans continue to buy simply because of the name brand.

Casting News & Production Begins for Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark! Early Thoughts

3 Sep

Alvin Schwartz‘s book trilogy, Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, is getting ready to film, and headlining this work are Michael Garza (Wayward Pines, The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1), Austin Abrams (Brad’s Status, The Americans), Gabriel Rush (Moonrise Kingdom, The Grand Budapest Hotel), Austin Zajur (Fist Fight, Kidding), and Natalie Ganzhorn (Make it Pop). Production started this week and the first movie is due to hit theatres hopefully in the 2019/20 season.

This film is being produced by Guillermo del Toro, Sean Daniel, Jason Brown, J. Miles Dale and Elizabeth Grave. It will be directed by André Øvredal (The Autopsy of Jane Doe, Trollhunter), and the adaptation will be handled by Kevin Hageman and Dan Hageman (Trollhunters: Tales of Arcadia), del Toro, Patrick Melton &and Marcus Dunstan.

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100+ years of Cinema and the Sequential Art, A Primer

22 Aug

Blondie Movie PosterBy Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Movies based on comic strips/books are big business, and not all of them were based on superheroes. The idea to adapt popular titles began way before Marvel and DC comics formed and this essay offers a highlight reel of these other popular works. In the early days of cinema, French journalist Georges Sadoul believed Louis Lumière‘s L’Arroseur Arrosé (1895) was an adaptation of L’Arroseur (The Gardener), a strip by artist Hermann Vogle. [1] The next work which followed was based on the British comic Ally Sloper (1867). Three films were made.

In the golden age of cinema, superheroes did not command the screen. Instead, these projections were humourous looks at everyday life. Harold Teen (1928) may well be the first to arrive on the big screen in North America. Blondie (1930) was immensely popular because of its look at middle-class suburbia. The early years followed the romance of this eponymous character to Dagwood, the comic relief, and the media buzz upon their marriage is comparable to the media hoopla when Peter Parker aka Spiderman married Mary Jane.

To be fair, certain key heroes like Batman and Superman will be explored. Also, television played an important role in popularizing this genre. Periodic looks at what happened on this front will also be offered.

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