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Getting a Sneak Peak to the Ben 10 Reboot (coming April 2017)

13 Mar

By Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

While most of Europe aired the new Ben 10 rebooted series since fall of last year, fans from North America are still anxiously waiting. Teletoon Canada offered a sneak peek Monday night for what’s to come in Spring. This new series is better off packaged as two episodes for the time-slot it is given instead of 10 minutes (giving a lot more time for commercials), before jumping to another show.

Given that the intended audience is for kids with limited attention span, the 10-minute format is satisfactory. But I’m craving longer tales, and am hoping by binge-watching a bunch of episodes back to back will reveal a greater story arc.

Tonight’s broadcast sees Ben Tennyson (Tara Strong reprises the role) learning responsibility. His access to the internet gets taken away until he cleans the Rust Bucket, a camping van that he, his cousin Gwen (Montserrat Hernandez) and grandfather Max (David Kaye) rides in throughout their many adventures. When the alien Fly Guy attempts to steal it because it reeks of garbage, this boy has a lot to do before his family returns! Amusingly enough, they are off to visit a bat guano cave.

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Is “Camelot/3000” Out of Left Field in DC’s Legends of Tomorrow?

1 Mar

nick-zano-and-brandon-routh-in-legends-of-tomorrowBy Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

In this late commentary, I thought last week’s DC’s Legends of Tomorrow episode “Camelot/3000” was disappointing. After three more viewings, there were tiny moments to enjoy, but the overall revisionist concept just did not jive well with the established Arthurian lore I adored when I studied it multiple times in my scholastic life. There are many alternatives, ranging from T.H. White’s The Once and Future King and The Book of Merlin to BBC One’s Merlin. Most of them stay faithful to what’s established, and some even have feminists take. All of which I liked, but there were times this Legends version forgot what it should focus on. Only one character knew.

I read the graphic novel to which I thought the story might take inspiration from. The 12-issue comic book series saw Arthur awakening far too soon. Although he saw to rebuilding Camelot, soon both he and his knights get called to action when his country needs him to fight against an invading alien threat. Ray explained the heart of the episode best, “Camelot is not about history, or a dusty old book that got a lonely kid through childhood (to which I can relate, as The Legends of King Arthur and his Knights compiled and arranged by Sir James Knowles K.C.V.O. was given to me in Elementary school to enjoy). It’s about one noble idea.”

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The Day of the Doctors is coming to Anglicon!

26 Feb

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By Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

No, the producers behind Doctor Who is not remaking The Two Doctors. In 2017, Anglicon is bringing two actors from the classic years — Peter Davison and Sylvester McCoy (the latter announced today) — to entertain! The Fifth incarnation is better known as Tristan Farnon in All Creatures Great and Small and the Seventh gained greater notoriety when he played Radagast in Peter Jackson’s adaptation of The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien. During this convention, the two might talk about their career after leaving the show/ was cancelled. Unlike the performers from the new series who have left to have a career in America, getting noticed back in the 90’s was a lot more difficult. Davison did appear in an episode of Magnum P.I. “Deja Vu” and McCoy reprised the iconic role in FOX TV’s Doctor Who Movie, but mostly stuck to performing in the U.K. Perhaps these two will have something to say about the changing scene.

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Going Beyond the Brick with LEGO Batman

21 Feb

cym_yo1w8aqqn_zBy Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

I very rarely get excited about all the toys released along with an animated film. With How to Train Your Dragon, the variety of reptiles seen on-screen only salivated my appetite for owning a model of each because I love the designs. In the movie, LEGO Batman, I got giddy over the garage full of vehicles the caped crusader uses in his fight against crime and if only I had a couple of thousand dollars. Buying the bricks is not cheap because a lot of the money goes towards name brand recognition and licensing rights than manufacture. All reason went out the window when I saw Scutter, Batman’s mech change from robot mode to airplane.

Can I hope the model does the same? I’ll have to look at YouTube videos to find out, or just buy it. I caved and bought the set, not only because I liked the personality given to it, and enjoyed how the film gave to fans a perfect examination of two properties. Not only did it examine why the man behind the cowl is what he is but also it stayed true to what the brick represents. It’s become more than a kid’s construction toy and it helps creates a foundation to spur creativity.

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