Tag Archives: Idris Elba

After Three Thousand Years of Longing, Should That Be, “I’d Do Anything For Love?”

5 Sep

Three Thousand Years of LongingI’m no stranger to the djinni narrative when considering my love for One Thousand and One Nights, but as for being as well versed as Dr. Alithea Binnie (Tilda Swinton) in Three Thousand Years of Longing, she has me beat. As a narratologist (an individual who studies tales which impact our perception of culture in the world around us), she knows something that mythologists don’t. This tale is as compelling as Bill Moyers’ interview with Joseph Campbell (Power of Myth), and what’s explored considers why this trope persists to this day. The last work I read was Three Little Wishes, which is a British take on the concept.

In what George Miller deconstructs may well be a Australian verion. He examines the rules for living a fulfilling life over being confined to the mundane. That’s the problem Binnie faces, and when she awakens the Djinni (Idris Elba) in the bottle, what he offers condemns her world view–she knows his kind from literature. And when he tries to rebuff the stereotype, the fun tête-à-tête they have reveals a look of his life and those he’s attempted to make better–if it can be called that. But sadly, he’s been forced to return to the glass container every time.

 

Continue reading

Is Sonic the Hedgehog Two or Three Times the Coming Thing?

12 Apr

Sonic the Hedgehog 2 film poster.jpgIn the sequel to Sonic the Hedgehog, the speedster lost his world to a war between different animal tribes. The first film revealed how his owl guardian sent him off to another planet to stay safe, like Superman. The humans he’s met–Tom (James Marsden) and Maddie Wachowski (Tika Sumpter)–became his surrogate parents.

Sonic doesn’t have the chops for super heroics in the introduction. It’s easy to tell he (fondly voiced by Ben Schwartz) takes after the heroes from the comic books he reads, like the aforementioned crusader and The Flash from the DC universe. Alternatively, he’s even like Quicksilver in 20th Century Studios’ X-Men (prequel) cinematic universe. The visual reminders are needed since not everyone will remember the visual direction and story arc the first film sets up. This sequel takes place a few months after.

Commander Walters (Tom Butler) is back and the reason behind one of the subplots. All the key supporting characters return as they play a role in either Sonic’s well being or wanting to study his power.

Continue reading

Who Is The Puppet Master in The Suicide Squad?

11 Aug

DC FanDome: 'The Suicide Squad' Unveils Cool Footage And New PostersBy Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Warner Brothers
Playing at theatres and HBO Max

Spoiler Alert

James Gunn has topped himself since he was given complete freedom to redo Suicide Squad. That 2016 film was great at introducing villains to do the dirty work that Uncle Sam doesn’t want to acknowledge, but isn’t all that memorable. This 2021 soft reboot that adds The to the title surpasses everything David Ayer attempted, and ups the ante. James‘ eccentric vision even includes a crazy build up to the finale typical for a Troma film (where this filmmaker got his start). Whether Ayer had to abide by the rules the Warner Bros and DC established with this franchise or he just did not understand the characters at all, Gunn makes the motley crew (from beginning to end instead of those who survived) rootin’, tootin’ hilarious

Continue reading

Star Trek: Beyond Explores the Wild West But What’s Next?

29 Jul

Star Trek Beyond PosterBy Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

Half-way through the five-year mission in Star Trek Beyond, the crew of the USS Enterprise are starting to plan for their future. Some have settled in to a comfortable life, finding relationships with fellow crew-mates, and others are just wanting it to be over. Before the end of the first act, Captain James T. Kirk (Chris Pine) mentions he’s looking to continue his career elsewhere, and still has a few daddy issues to mull over. Spock (Zachary Quinto) has his own share of problems and the rest of the crew are considering their options.

As for what happens next, a stop for supplies at a space station in the shape of a hexagonal orb is more like a new beginning. As options are weighed, one last mission is requested at a nebula that has not been fully explored. Here, shades of Star Trek Deep Space Nine is hinted at. Instead of a wormhole for wayfarers to go through, the expanse of space is filled with a different hazard — aliens not encountered before.

Continue reading

Baring Down on Jon Favreau’s The Jungle Book & Fond Recollections of a Tale Spin

24 Apr

THE JUNGLE BOOK

By Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

Disney‘s live-action update to The Jungle Book shares a few visual and narrative similarities with its 1967 counterpart. While it’s a fun nod, I thought the nostalgia was unneeded. In what I enjoyed was a look at a darker, if not more violent, road to adulthood for a child found in the woods. A few scenes will most likely frighten toddlers but for youths, they may handle the bloodshed better. In the animal kingdom, these beasts have to scrounge for their meals and in this version, part of the tale is about the survival of the fittest.

Part of why I love this world is because of Tale Spin . This Disney Afternoon cartoon used characters from this work, introduced new ones (Don Carnage is a hoot) and placed the irrepressible Baloo the Bear (voiced by Phil Harris in the ’67 film, Ed Gilbert in the ‘toon and Bill Murray in this live-action film) in the lead role. Murray nails the adorability factor easily. While there’s no denying Gilbert was following in Harris’ footsteps for tonality and characterization, the generational factor is key to defining which version is going to be the most loved.

Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: