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The Black Panther is Lean, but not Quite Mean

16 Feb

black_panther_posterBy Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

  • Spoiler Alert

Enough has been said in early reviews of why Marvel Studios’ Black Panther is great. It plays the race card right. No clear winners are defined because part of the narrative is about freedom from oppression. This detail is internalized in the conflicts between man vs man. Missing is the spiritual discourse which made me interested in this hero played by Chadwick Boseman when he was introduced in Captain America: Civil War.

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School’s Not Out, but Eerie with Blackwood College in May!

6 Feb

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By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

When I’m huge fan of occult tales and strange mysteries taking place in within a post academic institution visiting Blackwood College is my cup of tea! This place almost your typical Harry Potter. It’ll look at a different age group saving the world, but first, they must learn how!

Today, Dark Horse Comics announced the coming release of Blackwood College. This work comes from two talents I greatly respect. I’ve read Evan Dorkin’s Beasts of Burdin, and the thrilling journey offered in this furry tale (not of the anthropomorphic kind) got me hooked. I first met these creatures in Dark Horse Book of … series which includes, the Dead, Witches and Hauntings.

With this fantastic gateway teaser image and mention of what’s to come — to have a varient cover by Becky Cloonan (Gotham Academy, Pretty Deadly) — has certainly caught my attention! Subsequent variants will be done by Tyler Crook, Declan Shalvey, and Jordie Bellaire. Further information will most likely be announced when Emerald City Comic Con takes place the first weekend of March. Who knows, maybe the image presented here will be offered as a print to anyone attending this company’s booth.

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Deep in the Throat of Rasputin: The Voice of the Dragon #4, Hellboy Omnibus News & More!

6 Feb

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

  • Releases Feb 7th
  • Mild Spoiler Alert

The action in Rasputin: The Voice of the Dragon #4 by Dark Horse Comics is getting intense. In what readers know so far, Sandu and Bruttenholm went behind enemy lines to figure out what the ghost of Albert Mayhew represents. The Nazis are interested in him. The last issue saw them discover macabre experiments to bring the dead back to life. It’s funny to see how the Nazi’s treat the dead. Or rather, in how somewhat Frankenstein their attempts are like. Instead of stitching different bodies together, they are brought back to life with bubble nodules, rubber tubes, and Tesla coils. The artwork of Christopher Mitten really shines here. The designs for the jackal guardians are simply fantastic!

The dual is now behind enemy lines to investigate what the enemy is up to. Unfortunately, have been captured, and just how they can escape will require a miracle.

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You Don’t Have to Ride a Dark Horse to run away from, er read Hungry Ghosts!

27 Jan

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

  • Mild spoiler alert

Author and chef, Anthony Bourdain (Kitchen Confidential) and novelist Joel Rose are back with more culinary shenanigans in Hungry Ghosts. They wrote Get Jiro!, a send-up about food culture for DC/Vertigo six years ago and their play on words with this new title (published by Dark Horse Comics) is not a send-up on the traditional meaning, where ancestral spirits are forgotten by future generations.  With this new work, veneration is explored in a different sense.

On a dark, haunted night, Mr. Fedachenko, a Russian oligarch dares a circle of Michelin star international chefs to play the samurai game of 100 Candles—where each storyteller has to tell a terrifying tale. Each of them better pray they can survive the challenge. This game is not like Russian Roulette. Instead, it’s a test of courage and perhaps a means to summon the undead. By the time the last candle is blown out, the hope nothing demonic is present.

Issue #1 is due to hit stands January 31st. In my preview, I was salivating over the modern delights of this retelling and modernization of supernatural lore from Japan. I find this culture’s — and my own (China) — take on the paranormal far more phantasmagorical than their Western cousins. Nothing against Europe and the gothic tradition, but in Asia, the often colourful and misty backdrop makes for a far more worrisome world for mortals to live in. In Japan, this world is revered. In Europe, it was often feared.

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