Tag Archives: Sociology

VisionTV’s Ageless Gardens & Timeless Passion

16 Feb

AG303 Karen York 4.jpgBy Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Programming Note: Encores of Season 2 episodes follows after each new Season 3 episode. Mondays at 9pm and 9:30pm ET. Please check online listing for local schedule.

VisionTV’s Ageless Gardens has grown up since its debut two years ago. The stories look at how to be green. That is, we see how others grow their own foods, develop their well being and give back to the land. In turn, the ground returns its beauty in bounty to please our senses. This show is not about the food, but how we remain forever young.

The coverage I offered when this program debuted is on twohungryblokes.com. Series two offered similar shorts mostly from the perspective of folks local to British Columbia and there were a few segments from beyond. They all showed us how important staying true to valued ideals are best and also revealed new ideas in how to harvest from the land without harming ecosystems.

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Bullied: You Are Not Alone on VOD. A Documentary Review

10 Feb

Available On Demand on Select Streaming Platforms

Coming to Tubi on Feb 12, 2021

For updates, please visit their Facebook page.

Bullying in any form is socially unacceptable, and the nerd/geek community is often the target because we continue to love stuff that other people have outgrown. Filmmaker Thomas Keith‘s documentary Bullied: You Are Not Alone examines the nature of the beast, and I feel it’s a must for every high school curriculum to show in Social Studies. It’s important for teachers to also encourage discussion so everyone can have an easier time in school instead of doing something they may regret later, like dropping out of society (and life). This subject really should be relabelled History, but I digress.

This work brilliantly shows us how bullying behaviour developed over time, and the range is from the cave man days to where we’re at in the 21st Century with cyber-bullying (on any social media platform). When looking at the statistics revealed about Americans, the numbers concerning those being harmed are terrible! Correcting this universal problem is not easy and in what makes this work special is that it shows us possible solutions to change this troubling aspect of society.

The stories we see here aren’t about those facing a challenging social life in school. There’s also workplace bullying and how people treat others when one may have a disability or other characteristic (like race) the other doesn’t like.

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Krampus for the Holiday Season? (Part One)

3 Dec

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

You better not pout when a different kind of supernatural force comes to town this holiday season. Some revellers may well encounter the Christmas Devil–aka Krampus! This name is a derivation of the Germanic word krampen (claw) and some may say he’s as old as time. This creature has changed over the years. In the old days of Germany, before the coming of Christianity, children feared the wild and woolly horned beast. Any child known to be misbehaving was whipped with a birch stick (or a swath of) by this monster. Some were even taken away to the underworld never to be seen again. The lucky who were “released” most likely promised to mend their ways.

In later years, he was known to visit villages with Saint Nicholas on Krampus Night (Krampusnacht; Dec 5th)! The good were rewarded by his friend and the bad found sticks of birch left in their shoe (it was a tradition to leave it out on this night). These days, a chance encounter from someone cosplaying as him doesn’t always provoke the same response.

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TheNFB at the 2020 Vancouver Film Fest!

6 Sep

The world premiere of Sundance award-winning Vancouver filmmaker Jennifer Abbott’s new feature doc The Magnitude of All Things (Cedar Island Films/Flying Eye Productions/NFB) tops a powerful lineup of National Film Board of Canada (NFB) produced and co-produced documentary and animation at the 2020 Vancouver International Film Festival (VIFF), taking place September 24 to October 7.

Two NFB feature docs by acclaimed creators are also making their BC debuts:

  • Inconvenient Indian by Michelle Latimer, a filmmaker, producer, writer and activist of Algonquin, Métis and French heritage.
  • John Ware Reclaimed by Cheryl Foggo, a Calgary-born filmmaker, author and playwright whose work often focuses on the Black Canadian experience.

The festival is presenting two NFB animated shorts:

  • The Great Malaise by Quebec animator and illustrator Catherine Lepage.
  • The Fake Calendar by Meky Ottawa, from the Atikamekw Nation in Quebec, produced through the Hothouse program.

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