Tag Archives: Mythology

Atlantis in Pop Culture in Jessica Dwyer’s Mytheries

10 Jul

inerorer: The Legend of AtlantisBy Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

On The Paranormal Network on YouTube

Atlantis is not the only lost civilization thought to exist. Whether it’s a product of one philosopher’s imagination or not—or was part of an epoch of Earth’s past—this topic always needs many points of view and ongoing debate to find where it may exist. Jessica Dwyer’s latest Mytheries episode on The Paranormal Network nicely explores all the possibilities. Everything that’s covered on the Wiki is also covered here. Her approach, which mixes in academics and pop culture, is ideal for those who are who are curious in where the fictional depictions got their inspirations from.

Keeping up with anthropological digests about the search for the ‘real version’ is tough. Also, there’s little progress since the last big documentary. I’m very interested in the quest and subscribe to Ancient Origins for my updates instead of relying on media reports to get my information.

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The Paranormal Network is about Cryptids & Mythology Too!

10 Jun

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

New Episode(s) Available Every Week
With the next Mytheries June 28 and That Bigfoot Show July 12

The Paranormal Network is growing there’s two programs worth checking out. The parent company. Joblo.com, shuffled their paranormal subjects under the new banner. I still argue cryptozoology is its own discipline, since it deals with beings that have left a trail of alleged evidence behind. However, it should be noted that this channel is still growing. There’ll be regular weekly content and of the five different shows, all of them stand out in their own unique way.

That Bigfoot Show is a short format style video blog about cryptids in context with the world of pop culture. Taylor James Johnson certainly knows his stuff. These segments have a Pokemon GO vlogger vibe as he’s in the field, on hikes in various woods, and perhaps hoping for that once-in-the-lifetime chance to catch the giant. His dialogue isn’t scripted. On any stumbles or need to edit his talk, television, cinematic or comic book b-roll is placed over his talking head moments.

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Reading Between the Lines in How Netflix’s Ragnarok May End

2 Jun

Ragnarok Season 2: Will Laurits Turn Out To Be Loki's Embodiment? -  TheNationRoarBy Ed Sum 
(The Vintage Tempest)

Spoiler Alert

Just how many seasons of Netflix Ragnarok can run for will be tricky to determine. Binge watchers who finished viewing season two will no doubt want the next set to broadcast sooner than later. The end times will come, and the question I have concerning this rebirth of the old gods is how often does this apocalypse happen? This series may have been influenced by the writings of Matthias Gardell’s book, Gods of the Blood: The Pagan Revival and White Separatism (Amazon USA link).

My guess is that whenever Loki’s spirit is truly locked up for good and he cannot be reborn. Laurits embodies this trickster god and Jonas Strand Gravli is simply amazing in giving this modern reinterpretation a lot of soul. He’s struggling with identity (“Brothers in Arms”) and becomes a goth mid-season. Much like Marvel Entertainment’s version played by Tom Hiddleston, his agenda is multifold. He wants to be loved by his blood parents, but they use him (Vidar seemingly comes around in “Power to the People”). His loyalty to his half-brother is half-hearted despite Magne (the reincarnation of Thor) always coming to his aid.

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Time Travelling with the Acursian

19 Dec

DEC201545 - ACURSIAN GN (SEP208684) - Previews WorldBy Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Legendary Comics
Available to order on Amazon USA

Hopefully John Barrowman isn’t spreading himself too thin should he decide to co-author more comic book stories. I enjoy seeing him on screen and he’s a terrific entertainer. He played Captain Jack Harkness, an individual from a far off future who suddenly can’t age, in Doctor Who. Although unceremoniously dumped in the past, he bore witness to many events in Earth’s history, but for this character, he could not interfere!

In the webcomic Acursian (an Old English word defined as one consigned to destruction, misery, or evil by a curse) which he created with his sister, Carole Barrowman, he is Charlie Stewart, a man at odds with himself and his past. He’s intentionally made unlikable at first, but once you get to know him, there’s a redemption arc to enjoy.

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Where to find Krampus Around The World (Part Two)

5 Dec

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Krampus is certainly a very famous creature for the early holiday season! On December 5th, he has to visit a lot of homes throughout Germany to identify who the wicked children are.

But in order for him to get around, even he needs help! Saint Nicholas can only do so much, and perhaps all that’s needed is a wormhole so he can jump around. Realistically, he just needs other people who serve the same purpose as him to punish those who had been bad in the past year.

Some folks say he’s the one and only original. All others pale. Fortunately, this statement is not true. Although Krampus has been around since circa 4th Century AD, a few other figures have popped up in later centuries to help out or serve a similar purpose as him in other countries.

On this list includes a top ten (approximately):

In Hungary, St. Mikulás is basically Saint Nicholas without Krampus tagging along. He has full honours. The representative forces of good and evil who tag along is a generic angel and devil. The dentist may well replace the latter because any child who consumed all the sweets in a day may well have cavities!

In other parts of Germany, three legends have a sixth sense for identifying the naughty.

The Belsnickel hail from the Palatinate region of southwestern Germany along the Rhine, the Saarland, and the Odenwald area of Baden-Württemberg. He’s special because he was directly brought to America by immigrants who landed in the east coast to form the Pennsylvania Dutch colonies. But his influence is not limited to this region. Some have brought this figure to be recognized in Canada. Alternative names include Kriskinkle, Beltznickle, Pelsnichol, and the Christmas woman.

Like Mikulás, he visits alone instead of accompanying his compatriots.

Frau Perchta is better known in Austria and Southern Germany. Stories of her dates from the 13th Century and are often varied. In what ties her to this season is in how families can maintain order. More specifically, for the lady of the house to have finished spinning that flax into threads for use as linen. If it’s not done by the Twelfth Night (January 6th), she’ll know and thrash that house! And yes, she’ll punish the woman of the house instead of the kids.

She’ll slice open the stomachs of those who have been bad. This gruesome fate can be avoided by families who make Perchtenmilch (a porridge) and offer it to her. They have a taste as though it’s to represent stuffing themselves with garlic to spoil the meat.

Haling from the northern territories is Knecht Ruprecht and he’s truly a wild man of the woods.

He didn’t come into prominence until the 17th Century. One account of his origin describes him as a human whom Saint Nicholas saved. Because of his size and strength, he did all the heavy lifting. He didn’t appear in literature until the late Middle Ages.

The confusion of whether the Krampus-like figure is man or beast is interesting. There’s no solid reason he must be furry and horned.

In France, Hans Trapp (Hans von Trotha) was a knight of ill repute. His infamy came because of his feud with the Order of Benedictine monks at Weissenburg Abbey and after death, he became a supernatural figure (because of his imposing height) to which many say appear in December, accompanying Saint Nicholas, in his sojourn to reward children.

The kids who weren’t got to hear about his legend, and the hope is that they will change their ways (akin to a certain Charles Dickens story) so they don’t end up like him.

Only two stories (one 12th Century piece and another 16th) exist to identify who Père Fouettard once was.

He committed murders and for some strange reason, was redeemed. He mended his ways after witnessing one of Saint Nicholas miracles and vowed to help. When considering this tale contains notes of cannibalism, the judicial system of France (more like the saint) is very lenient!

However, the other tale which saw the war with the Holy Roman Empire grow very inhospitable, just what he represents is not very well explained. Tanners took what they witnessed and created a new version of this figure. His purpose was to be the bad cop to the good cop that Père Noël represents.

His sphere of influence is in the North and Eastern regions of France, South of Belgium, and French-speaking areas of Switzerland.

Further north, in the Netherlands, lives Zwarte Piet (aka Black Peter). His time may well be up when considering today’s socially correct climate.

In 1850, he was introduced to the modern world as a dark-skinned servant from the Moors who would help Saint Nicholas out on December 5th. He’s less about punishing, but more about why many social classes exist. In parades, his role is to distribute gifts to those his superior has found to be good and not admonish anyone who admitted has done wrong in the past year.

In Italy,, La Befana is not as widely known. Some folklorists believe she’s a modern creation to reveal how good deeds are often rewarded. Those who helped received a gift, and those who ignored her got a thwack of her broom.

This concept came from how she helped the Three Wise Men. They came to her abode seeking rest one night, and she gave them a place to stay. They invited her to join, but she declined (a decision she would later regret). When she realized she’s missing out in history, her pilgrimage became the stuff of legend and she’s forever looking for baby Christ.

But the list doesn’t end there. Three fantastical monsters exist.

Over in Iceland Grýla has been around since the 13th century and she’s an ogre. This Christmas witch didn’t get this label until the 19th Century.

In this country, Yule is celebrated and has similarities to Halloween. The supernatural can wander the mortal realm and do what they like! This matriarch of beasts hunts down naughty boys so she can make soup out of them! Her kids, the Jólasveinar (Yule Lads) have the duty to scare children to behave when even she has a tough go (or is busy preparing the soup base).

When they aren’t tough enough, the Jólakötturinn (Yule Cat) comes out. He can only be placated by seeing kids wear new clothes. The poem the latter exists in is told by parents to encourage their kids to work hard year round!

Ultimately, these creations are similar such that they are to frighten or punish those miscreants. The hope is for them to change their ways, otherwise where they end up is often at the end of a stick or in the stomach of one of these beasts. No child wants that!

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