Tag Archives: Mythology

Chinese Animated Nezha Arrives West in Select Cinemas!

26 Aug

Image result for nezha movie posterWell GO USA

The power of myth is strong in China; Nezha is a guardian deity who perhaps rivals the fame of the Monkey King. Both are household names, and the literature they hail from is the most studied. It’s a classical work which teaches prime virtues to which many folks from this country tend to follow.

In Journey to the West, this human fought the primate when he rebelled. They would later become friends. The 3D animated movie about the boy to become a god debuted early this year and it has been making huge waves as it looks to this man’s early days–demonized and not knowing his place in the world–before being the individual he is now.

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[Fantasia 2019] The Moon in the Hidden Woods, A Movie Review

31 Jul

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

CAST: Lee Jihyon, Jung Yoojung, Kim Yul

When the Moon is longer illuminating the night sky, the kingdom around Trade City is thrown into chaos. Muju, the red sky, is like Sauron from Lord of the Rings. What he wants is to destroy the world. His agent, Count Tar is far more dangerous than anyone can realize. But when the Moon no longer rose from Twilight (it’s resting place) to bring peace throughout the land, the protectors disappeared.

People started to talk. Rituals to honour this lunar deity stopped. The brave went across the desert wasteland to find the Moon in the Hidden Woods.  This apt title sets the tone of this South Korean animated film which borrows heavily on local folklore and the Hero’s Journey to tell its tale.

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On Godzilla, Ghidorah and the Monsterverse

7 Jun

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Spoiler Alert

The epic showdown I’ve been craving since Legendary Pictures acquired the license to play with Godzilla is here! In part two of maybe a trilogy, the world of monsters mankind lives in is filled with hidden agendas and a fear for the future. Our time on Earth may well come to an end. The Titans, monsters capable of mass destruction, will reclaim their territory. Can we live side by side in a symbiotic relationship, as Dr. Serizawa (Ken Watanabe) hopes? Or as TOHO Studio’s animated take suggests, will civilization regress to simpler times?

No real continuity exists between these two studio’s works. Legendary’s version is limited. Only a handful of films can be made before the terms of the contract expire. With a bigger budget, fans can see a massively CGI driven apocalyptic take of monsters ravaging each other and the world. Practical effects can only go so far, and motion capture can do a lot more these days. As this sequel takes place five years later, the Monarch organization is ready for the inevitable. In what they know and have uncovered since–humanity better be afraid!

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The Epic Book Tour: Gareth Hinds with Homer’s The Illiad

23 Mar

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Gareth Hinds is a prolific illustrator who worked in the video game industry for over ten years and still found the time to self-publish. Technically, that’s before Candlewick Press discovered him, and when they called him up to offer a deal, it was one he could not pass up!

Some fans know him for the cult hit, System Shock 2, and others may recall his earlier works, namely his adaptation of Beowulf. His artistic interpretations of literary classics are simply spellbinding. He has published ten books in all, including The Odyssey. As the recipient of Boston Public Library’s “Literary Lights for Children” award, his works can be found in use in classrooms across the country. Reading some of these classical works is not always easy, and to have the right kind of art to have young minds interested in the original material makes the process of learning how to read easier. Perhaps, one day, he may attempt Milton’s Paradise Lost.

Personally, I’m quite drawn to his works which looks at classical antiquity. In Poe: Stories and Poems, my taste for the macabre gets satisfied. His latest work is Homer’s The Iliad which took more than two years to produce! When this book clocks in at 270 pages and 95% of it are illustrations, the wait is certainly worthwhile. It is now available through bookstores like Amazon. To coincide with the release is a book tour. The remaining dates can be found at the end of this interview.

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