Tag Archives: Book Review

From Script to Book, Trollhunters! an Ongoing Saga

21 Jul

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Writer Richard A Hamilton can very easily further any fan’s love for DreamWorks Trollhunters. His work in the ongoing book series published by Simon Spotlight expands the world in legendary ways such that readers get to learn more about the history of Trollkind. As the wait for the next chapter in the Tales of Arcadia saga continues and this dedicated fan needs troll food badly, I am glad more tales are being told through the comic book/print medium.

The first graphic novel, “The Felled” is due to hit shelves in mid-October. Here, Hamilton explores the problems of being “boyfriend” material. Ever since Jim and Claire made it official, trying to make their relationship is not going to be easy, and Trollkind’s idea of courtship may well get examined. The history of Trollkind and their mating rituals may well be at the core of this first work. This chapter of the saga is illustrated by Timothy Green II.

In the written front, Four books are available to purchase (with more coming) and I knew I did not want to jump in with book three upon finding them at my local bookstore. The first volume is simply a retelling of “Becoming.” The scenes cut out are restored. The prologue centers in on Kanjigar. He knows his time is up and a new hero is needed. This Trollhunter prior to Jim Lake Jr. was well respected in Troll Market and for him to say his farewells is not without some sniffles. I feel the Knights of the Round Table will one day appear because this take of the Trollhunters saga reflects even more chivalric ideals.

Continue reading

Why Bury The Anubis Tapestry? A Book Review & What Could Have Been …

13 Jul

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

No reasons were fully revealed about why the cinematic adaptation of The Anubis Tapestry by Illumination Entertainment was removed from schedule. I had to seek out the book and wonder what was I missing? It’s doubtful that the story was untranslatable to screen. Author Bruce Zick is no stranger to the industry. He worked on the development of successful films like Prince of Egypt, Hercules and Wall*E. The project seemed like it was in perfect hands since the tale had all the elements required for a fun-filled adventure!

The story about a young boy wishing to be closer to his dad is good. When Chance Henry is left to his own devices to entertain himself, it’s not so much about the gang he hangs out with, but rather the distance growing between father and son. Mother died a while ago and when pops is often preoccupied with work, there’s no time for the two to bond. The senior is the curator for the Portland Museum of Eastern Antiquities. When two new mummies arrived for him to get ready for display, neither would realize Egyptian curses are real!

Continue reading

A Trendy or Cool Japan? These Case Studies will Enlighten! A Book Review

26 Oct

By Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

Tim Craig’s Cool Japan is an excellent study in nearly everything a student of Japanese pop culture will want to know more of and get answers to those aspects he or she is afraid to ask. If the product can be exported out of the country to experience then it is explored here. Specific companies are examined in this collection of essays, and the big three — traditional culture, popular culture and business — are looked at in synchronicity. The topics include nearly every aspect of the entertainment scene. Foodies will take delight in two chapters too (more on this later).

From the music industry to Sumo culture and even video games, the breadth of knowledge this author reveals (some units are in collaboration with others) is amazing. To take a look at the differences between Japanese games and Western ones is just one tiny part of this particular chapter. Not everyone knows about the details behind the merger of Square(soft) and Enix, and what it meant from a financial standpoint.

The title of this publication is aptly named as it is also the name of the initiative the Japanese government started back in 2010. The goal is to broaden the greatness of this country’s most exportable products and “capitalize commercially on the worldwide popularity of Japanese manga, anime, film, TV dramas, fashion, food, and other cultural products. It was also a response to the widely noted fact that—despite exceptions like Pokémon, Studio Ghibli and Sanrio’s Hello Kitty—Japan’s cultural industries were underperforming internationally. Despite the global popularity of their products, Japan’s cultural creators were earning far less than their counterparts in the United States and South Korea.”

Continue reading

“Victoria’s Most Haunted” Gets A New Book by Ian Gibbs!

7 May

51nsewsef1l-_sx322_bo1204203200_By Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

Presentation at Bolen Books 
1644 Hillside Ave #111
on May 9, 7pm

Many long-time residents of Victoria, British Columbia will not dispute the fact that this garden city is haunted. More ghosts are said to spook specific streets here, and most of the downtown core and neighbouring districts are covered in Ian Gibb’s debut book, “Victoria’s Most Haunted.”

From bars to homes to restaurants and schools, this variety of sites is welcome. A few places are missed — some of which I had the fortune to check out during my time with PARAVI, a local paranormal investigative society (understandably not mentioned in the book because it’s no longer in operation) — but to get every story crammed in means obtaining permission not only from the group but also from the current business operators to talk about them.

Continue reading