A New Urban Legend is Born in Mandy, A Movie Review

15 Oct

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

  • Spoiler Alert

No, Mandy Bloom (Andrea Riseborough) is not the wife/girlfriend of Paul Bunyan. When this movie by director Panos Cosmatos is titled after her, this character’s role is critical to driving the motives of another woodsman to a brink of madness. They were happy once. He’s a nobody about to become a somebody (more on this later). This woman is very forlorn; Riseborough is perfect in this role, offering pathos in her moments of sadness. Because of events that occurred in her youth, she never felt quite right. She prefers to live a life in isolation but yet, her feelings for Red (Nicolas Cage) when they first met, runs deep. The two are soul mates. One day, on her walk home, Jeremiah Sand, a priest of sorts, takes a liking to her and orders his minions to her kidnap her. Linus Roache must have been channeling Billy Drago’s trademark style of villainy, as I was sold instantly!

If you have not seen this movie yet, I advise checking it out sooner than later. It might stick around until Halloween, but it’s already nearing the end of its run at some theatres.

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Ad Nauseam, Newsprint Nightmares from the 80’s, A Book Review

13 Oct

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Author Michael Gingold admits to not being much of a horror fan back in 1979. He dabbled with a few films prior but after watching Halloween (god bless his grandparents, so he wrote), that film has changed his life. Anyone who knows this maestro will recognize his contributions to many a publication. From Fangoria to Rue Morgue (and back again), his contributions are well known. Enter Ad Nauseam: Newsprint Nightmares from the 1980s, a book which took more than a decade to make.

It collects nearly all the movie ads of horror films from this era. Flipping through this coffee table book is a conversation starter, especially amongst fans nostalgic for 80s horror movies. This book arrives just in time to before the next installment of Halloween arrives in theatres! Capsule reviews are included to remind readers of what critics back then thought of many a work.
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A Survivor’s Guide to Fan Expo Vancouver 2018, SHUX & Beyond

11 Oct

215d2-fanexpovancouverBy Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

This weekend, Fan Expo Vancouver and SHUX 2018 will be taking place at the Vancouver Convention Center, and the venue is going to be super packed! Finding parking will no doubt be a nightmare for those coming in on the day of, but for those who have their hotels booked, the hope is that they have enough space to accommodate the influx of fandom to the harbour. For those coming into the former event new, the following advice is offered:

For FEV: The lower level is the exhibition space. Level one (ground floor) and two will host panels, and if past experience is any indication, the escalators are one way only. People bouncing back and forth floors will have to exit the venue to enter by the west side, not east. Plenty of dining options exist on the east side. For a broader look into what’s available, please look at last year’s dining guide.

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My Pet Dinosaur Now on VOD, A Movie Review

11 Oct

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

The Australian film My Pet Dinosaur is finally getting American side distribution. It’s now on VOD platforms like iTunes and Google Play. For those who remember either the plush toy made by American Greetings or the animated series made by Nelvana, some people, like myself, may wonder if filmmaker Matt Drummond drew from this product as inspiration.

Although the pup dino looks very blue, this connection is hardly enough to say he did. When Jake Emory (Jordan Dulieu) creates a dinosaur out of mixing up random chemicals with contaminated water, the critter that emerges is cute as buttons. Eventually, an attachment forms. This lad and his brother Mike (Harrison Saunders), lost their father, and are taking it out on mom. This particular subplot does not feel as developed. Enough can be understood to realize they are not over the loss of their father, and they feel the need to act out.

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