Tag Archives: P. Craig Russell

By Thunder, Gaiman’s Norse Mythology is Now a Comic Book!

8 Oct

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Dark Horse Comics
Available Now

Neil Gaiman and P. Craig Russell’s comic book collaborations are usually always perfect. From their days with DC’s Sandman to Dark Horse Comics latest Norse Mythology, I don’t think I need to read the written work again. Well, I’ll have it on the bookshelf to crack open for a look ahead to what the comic book adaptation will soon offer. In issue #1, the first three chapters, Yggdrasil and the Nine Worlds (with Russell authoring), Mimic’s Head and Odin’s Eye (with art by Mike Mignola) and The Treasures of the Gods (as visualized by Jerry Ordway) are enigmatically featured. These talents are also regulars to this mini-series.

According to the publisher’s advance solicitations page, artist Piotr Kowalski will have a tale in issue #2, and the variant covers by David Mack are ongoing. His rainbow coloured portraits of wonder are worthy of being put on full size posters to hang in any art room. The first issue features Thor and Mjölnir as though they are on the rainbow bridge, and the light is misting around them and reflecting off the shiny armour like a Van Gogh painting.

Continue reading

Neil Gaiman’s Norse Mythology Rides a Dark Horse!

16 Dec

Today, Dark Horse Comics is pleased to announce the adaptation of Neil Gaiman’s Norse Mythology into comic book form! Featuring a pantheon of award-winning artists, including Mike Mignola, P. Craig Russell, and Jerry Ordway. Colorists Dave Stewart and Lovern Kindzierski and letterer Galen Showman round out the creative team in this amazing first issue. This new series will feature covers by P. Craig Russell with colors by Lovern Kindzierski and variant covers by David Mack. Subsequent issues of Norse Mythology (18 issues total) will feature a mix of major interior artists to be announced later.

“I fell in love with the Norse gods from reading about them in comics as a boy, so it’s only fitting that they return to the medium that started it,” said Norse Mythology creator Neil Gaiman. “I cannot wait to see P. Craig Russell and his collaborators tell the old stories for a new generation.”

After previously writing about deities in American Gods and The Sandman, Gaiman finally brings readers to follow the northern gods in their own setting in this comic book adaptation of the hit novel! Gaiman and P. Craig Russell breathe new life into the ancient Norse stories by taking readers through the creation of the Nine Worlds to the epic origin and adventures of Thor, Odin, and Loki all the way to the end of life—Ragnarök.

The first issue of Norse Mythology goes on sale May 27, 2020.

The Ring of Nibelung is on a Dark Horse Re-Release!

8 Dec

Available to pre-order on Amazon

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Release Date: January 02, 2019
Click here to preorder

Richard Wagner’s The Ring of Nibelung has seen countless adaptations into other forms of media over many years. The opera truly must be seen as it was this composer’s intention. To read a comic book adaptation may seem like a bad idea, but in what I enjoyed in Roy Thomas version is that it helped reignite my interest in the Nordic sagas. The art by Gil Kane was inspiring. This work was published by DC Comics in the 90s; to find it now means chancing upon a collection while at a comic book show.

In 2012, Dark Horse Comics released their own version in 2012 with P. Craig Russell handling the chores of not only the writer but also the artist. This edition has its own gentile style and modestly introduces the sagas without being too extravagant in the presentation. It collects all the single issue covers and production notes (on how he turned the opera into an illustrative work) into a 450-page book! His pencil sketches are worth noting more than the finished work–and I’m only scratching the surface. Reading this work is just as enchanting. To compress it (which can clock in at 5 hours, or 15 to detail the entire four-part saga) to a 448-page work is just as impressive.

The live performance can be daunting for the newcomer. Not everyone is into opera. To read this work in illustrative form is a great way to become familiar with the story before tackling the stage show. No matter which version I’m looking at, I feel that when I’m done, there’s no need to watch Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings again, for a while. Both share the one ring ideology and borrow from similar sources, and that’s all there is.