Tag Archives: David Mack

By Thunder, Gaiman’s Norse Mythology is Now a Comic Book!

8 Oct

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Dark Horse Comics
Available Now

Neil Gaiman and P. Craig Russell’s comic book collaborations are usually always perfect. From their days with DC’s Sandman to Dark Horse Comics latest Norse Mythology, I don’t think I need to read the written work again. Well, I’ll have it on the bookshelf to crack open for a look ahead to what the comic book adaptation will soon offer. In issue #1, the first three chapters, Yggdrasil and the Nine Worlds (with Russell authoring), Mimic’s Head and Odin’s Eye (with art by Mike Mignola) and The Treasures of the Gods (as visualized by Jerry Ordway) are enigmatically featured. These talents are also regulars to this mini-series.

According to the publisher’s advance solicitations page, artist Piotr Kowalski will have a tale in issue #2, and the variant covers by David Mack are ongoing. His rainbow coloured portraits of wonder are worthy of being put on full size posters to hang in any art room. The first issue features Thor and Mjölnir as though they are on the rainbow bridge, and the light is misting around them and reflecting off the shiny armour like a Van Gogh painting.

Continue reading

25 Years of David Mack’s Kabuki and An Omnibus!

12 Dec

Publication Date:
December 11, 2019

Released by:
Dark Horse Comics

Sony Picture‘s adaptation of David Mack’s Kabuki is coming to television and anyone not familiar with this cyberpunk treat can easily get updated with the omnibus collection! Not only is this work celebrating 25 years in publication but also the fact it continuing says something. The first volume brings “Circle of Blood” and “Dreams of the Deep” together in a perfect introduction to the seminal character. Ukiko was an innocent girl once, but as an assassin, she’s under a simple moniker.

The stories featured here are about the evolution of “The Warrior,” and no I’m not thinking of the song by Scandal featuring Patty Smyth. This music video may have inspired the artist/writer in its themes, but I feel Roxette’s “Dangerous” serves an equal amount of defining who Kabuki is. The first chapter deals with her training and how not to fail her employers. The South Asian world is dog eat dog, and she must navigate the corridors of deception and deceit if she’s to get by.

Continue reading