Tag Archives: Jeremy Lutter

The Mystery of The Ghost Town Killer. An Interview with Podcast Creators…

27 May

Jeremy_and_Marcy_0163_webBy Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Available on RedCircle
New episode every Tuesday

Some independent filmmakers had a tough time during the pandemic to stay creative, and others have adapted. For Jeremy Lutter and Marcy Waughtal of Lower Mainland based Broken Mirror Films in Vancouver, British Columbia, this duo adapted by venturing into producing audio dramas and crafted a piece of “Canadian Noir” with Ghost Town Killer, now available to listen to.

The two aren’t out to reproduce an old time radio show like Dragnet. Instead, they have a modern day tale which sees a young heroine, Lilith Black, digging for the truth and having problems in what to accept as the impossible (especially when this show features ghosts). Their primary focus is on making their tale as realistic as possible. Lutter describes this protagonist to have Fox Mulder’s (X-Files) drive in wanting to believe and Lisbeth Salanda’s (The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo) tenacity when dealing with people–despite being rough around the edges. 

Black has to explore places that no sane woman should. She’s looking for her sister’s killer. In Fort Macbeth, a town in B.C. lost to time, Lucy Fu’s been wrongfully accused of a different murder. There’s a serial killer on the loose and as Lilith gets her feet wet in all these various cases, she discovers the facts don’t always point to the truth. She’s dealing with prejudice and rivalries with the people she meets. Another figure she’ll encounter is mayor Tiffany Harp with a sordid past. Life isn’t easy in this township, and the influences the writing team drew upon are varied. They’re not making a show like theCW’s Riverdale either.

Continue reading

On the Making of Giltrude’s Dwelling, An Interview with Jeremy Lutter

22 Jan

giltrude dwelling_poster_smaller.jpgBy Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Giltrude’s Dwelling is set to make its hometown debut Jan 25th, during the Vancouver Shorts Film Fest, and writer Marcy Waughtal and director Jeremy Lutter could not be any happier. This piece is about a young girl who has seemingly lost her parents. They warn her about the dangers the outside has, especially at night. Their home teleports to new worlds every day. The question of whether it returns is asked, and by only going to see this work, answers can be given.

One night, the folks leave and Giltrude (played by Kennedi Clements, the young girl, and Kacey Rohl, adult) is waiting for their return. Years pass and this young lady has a lot to fear. However, there’s more to this work than meets the eye. Lutter saw something unique in Waughtal’s story and he believes it is has a lot to offer to the viewer.

“It’s a fairly common trait to let bad events have a big impact on your future,” said the filmmaker, “I have seen it ruin people’s lives. I also had my fair share of heartache in my life that I had to see past and not let it stop me. As soon as I read Waughtal’s script, it spoke to me.”

Continue reading

Putting Together “The Hollow Child” — An Interview with Jeremy Lutter and Ben Rollo

3 Feb
thc-bts-jeremy-lutter-and-ben-rollo

(left) Jeremy Lutter (right) Ben Rollo

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Plays
Feb 9, 9:00pm
Feb 11, 4:00pm

Silvercity
3130 Tillicum Rd.
Victoria, BC

The supernatural world of malevolent entities is never far in “The Hollow Child.” It’s in the woods and the neighbourhood — a concept director Jeremy Lutter and writer Ben Rollo effectively convey in their debut feature film premiering at the 2017 Victoria Film Festival, which starts today.

One of the telling visuals is how Lutter wanted the woods to appear outside of every window of the abode. Living by the forest can sometimes create a certain air of unease, especially if it’s everywhere. You never know what can thunder out. This danger is effervescent in “The Witch” (2016) and it may have inspired these two when making this work. Instead, in conversation, Lutter mused about the possibility of Rollo having his own dealings with those spirits since he lived by the woods. Part of the experiences seen in this film might be considered autobiographical.

“When living in the West Coast of Canada, it made sense to make the woods scary and have the story focus on the wild vs civilization,” said Lutter.

When the supernatural is involved, anything can be found in the wilds of British Columbia and this movie was filmed here. This province is well-known for its Bigfoot legends than fears over the ‘wee folks, namely gnomes or fairies from European tradition — to which this film takes inspiration from. With this movie, there’s a certain type of ‘tree-folk’ known to cause problems and, according to these filmmakers, the sleepy township is sort of aware of but does not talk about, which adds to this film’s ominous tone.

Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: