Tag Archives: Comedy

LEGO Ninjago Crystalized. Concerning Its Forbidden and Fragile Start.

17 Jun

Ninjago CrystalizedComing to Teletoon Canada
June 18th 10:00 am (PST)

LEGO’s animated series Ninjago is getting Crystalized. Despite finding this upcoming season had a strange release to online first, the wait to see how the story will continue is still worthwhile.

That is, those lucky enough to see the series on The LEGO Company’s YouTube page got more than a preview before being removed days later. Soon afterwards, it appeared on Netflix before also getting pulled. The reason may be due to arrangements with television networks. Its unusual start was certainly confusing, but thankfully, this season should be on track for debut on networks this coming week. In Canada, the first pair of episodes (out of twelve) are coming to TeleToon this weekend. As for other territories, please check your listings.

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It’s Delightful Disney’s Lilo and Stitch is Celebrating 20 Years! So Where Are They Now?

15 Jun

Lilo and Stitch

Lilo and Stitch are celebrating their 20th anniversary! Disney’s commitment to this odd couple is ongoing, including have a few pieces of exclusive merchandise (a pin and stuffed doll), and their plan for a live-action remake is late. There’s been no word on when or if it has begun filming. All fans can hope for is a release this year at least if it’s supposed to be for this celebration. 

Ever since this film’s release June 16, 2002, I’ve been obsessed with the blue fuzzy alien. The television series was about the duo collecting accidentally released experiments at the height of Pokémon’s popularity. Thus, I can’t say it was an appropriate continuation. I tuned in because Stitch’s silly antics never grew old.

But time would take its toll on this franchise. This extra-terrestrial phoned home. As a result, Disney Japan delivered two original animation videos, Planet of Sand and Perfect Memory to continue the alien’s adventures. More often than not, he found himself back on Earth, setting the course for further adventures on Disney Asia’s network. It’s sad Lilo grew up, but it had to happen. 

The releases to the Asian market aren’t in order, and it’s easy to get confused if the two new series (Lilo and Ai, and Stitch! The Series) are supposed to exist in the same universe, or chronology. According to the Wiki, the Chinese production is standalone and I enjoyed this alternate take of the classical formula. My look at this series can be read here.

The Japanese series has a better developed content, and follows after the events of the home video release, Leroy and Stitch. 

This program is more mature and shows Yuna (Stitch’s new companion) facing the same hurdles as Lilo did. One good thing about this show is that she’s not always a country bumpkin. This girl becomes has other problems to face. Also, she’ll have to learn how to live in the city with the blue alien in tow. Thankfully, an episode (“Reunion with Lilo”) in Stitch! suggests that the story is ongoing. It resolves any problems the two had. Lilo looks more like Nani and to see them back together brought tears to my eyes. 

But we got more stories than that. The manga series, Stitch, and the Samurai, was released last year.

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Fans can purchase each individual volume here (along with volumes two and three), or by clicking at each individual image through these Amazon USA links

While fleeing the Galactic Federation, Stitch’s spaceship malfunctions, and he makes an emergency landing not in Hawaii, but in Sengoku-era Japan! Lord Yamato and his clan find Stitch, and his cuteness is no match for the battle-weary samurai who brings the “blue tanuki” home and tries to make a pet.

Jumba and Pleakley aren’t too far behind, since the rodent is their responsibility. With no surprise, they help make Japan technologically advanced, and that’s not good for the rest of the world. It’s best not to spoil the three volume work, but it made for a fun weekend read. Plus, this graphic novel is also a flip-page animation book.

I hope there’ll be more manga featuring Stitch in these standalone works. Although he’s no longer a huge star like he was during his debut, his presence can still be found at Disney’s parks, and elsewhere. But for those who haven’t been keeping track of where he can be found in print, there’s also:

Comic Zone Volume 1: Disney’s Lilo and Stitch 

This trade paperback is a compilation of the comics that were printed in Disney Adventure magazine. These shorts are non-canonical.

Disney Manga: Stitch! Volume One

Stitch Volume One and Two

These stories by Yumi Tsukirino take place in the Japanese series continuity and are side-stories. The content is more for the K9 crowd than long time fans, but for completists, it’s something to have on the shelf just to show how much of a fan one is of the series.

Stitch! Best Friends Forever!

This particular volume has more substance to it when compared to the latter two. To note, the tales presented in this books are standalone works rather than a continuation of the series.

But for completists, viewers shouldn’t forget that these direct to video releases still hasn’t made the transition to Blu-ray just yet, and are available to purchase as DVDs:

Lilo and Stitch Direct to Video Releases (also available to Stream)

Leory & Stitch Stitch! The Movie

(Disclaimer: Otakunoculture.com is a member of Amazon Associate’s program, and any sales made help supports this site).

 

 

Crossing the Streams is Easier with Everything Everywhere All At Once Going Digital Today!

7 Jun

Available on Apple, Google Play and Amazon Prime
Home Video Release July 5th, 2022

Infinity may feel finite temporarily, but Michelle Yeoh’s Everything Everywhere All At Once is on VOD! The home release will arrive a month later to really spread the love for this well-made martial arts sci-fi comedy, and our movie review can be found here.

But for who can’t wait, this treat is looking like it’s best viewed on the Apple TV service. There’s a blooper reel that’s as hilarious as the hijinks that went on in the film. We have a well meaning tale about family togetherness that’s combined with multi-verse mayhem. A lot of comparisons have been said already concering a Marvel product, but in terms of which multiverse makes more sense, I’d say this work has an edge.

The Boss Baby is Back in the Crib, or Should That Be All Caged Up?

30 May

Streaming on NetflixThe Boss Baby Back in the Crib
Dreamworks Animation

The Boss Baby has problems, and the only way to survive the FBI investigation is to go Back in the Crib. Fans of this DreamWorks franchise are in for a treat as the entire Templeton family agrees to keep Ted (now voiced by John Paul Karliak) safe. He was living the life as a business tycoon. However, after finding his employees have been embezzling and framed him, he has nothing left.

This story arc doesn’t come into play throughout the twelve episode run and that’s very unusual. You’d think Ted would try to clear his name. Instead, he goes into hiding.

In contrast, the subplot about The Uncuddleables, a babysitter group who knows of Baby Corps, takes centre stage. They’re out to seize control. To see Ted deal with Baby Tina (Mary Faber nicely emulates Amy Sedaris‘ accent), who has taken over his role in the company, is the least of his worries. As a result, the hi-jinks are hilarious. Unless he and his niece get along, what’s going to happen next leads to more trouble that this institution can’t handle.

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The NFB’s Adds 2 New Comic Strip Chronicles and is Presenting at the Montreal Comic Arts Festival!

6 May

National Film Board of Canada LOGO

The National Film Board of Canada has humour and serious drama in store with two pieces now in its online Comic Strip Chronicles Collection. This series of shorts looks at the strong connection that exists with comic strips–in its traditional Sunday funnies format–with animation. When considering the latter, it also delves deep into thoughtful experiences too.

More events are planned this weekend. These two particular works will be screened at the Films et Table Ronde Entourant L’univers de la BD event (in French and organised by the NFB) and the Montreal Comic Arts Festival, beginning May 7.

There’s also a terrific retrospective written by Marc St-Pierre on The NFB’s blog to get readers up to speed on what the Animation Studio of the French Program has been up to in the past several years. The article is written in French, and it can be parsed through Google Translate.

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