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From Manga to Film, Alita: Battle Angel Reaching Zalem & Sequel Hopes

25 Feb

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

James Cameron and Robert Rodriguez’s live-action adaptation of Yukito Kishiro’s Gunnm (Alita: Battle Angel in America) barely scratches the surface of what the 28 volume manga is (including Last Order and excluding Mars Chronicles which is still ongoing). Ever since Cameron announced he secured the rights in 2000 to bringing Gally’s (her name in the original manga) story to the cinema, I wondered if all the series will be covered. The anime barely scratched the surface. According to Polygon, this producer secured the rights for future video treatments and no further animation is likely to happen.

This film uses most of the American naming conventions than stick to the original. The CGI and motion capture technology to realize what Cameron wanted was not there and the wait for this film was frustrating. Cameron’s first idea was to turn the heroine into a Joan of Arc type figure and thankfully Kishiro corrected him. Gally is a rōnin. She serves no master. It makes sense, because in all her travels in the manga, she either had to leave people she cares for behind or they will die. This detail was revealed in a taped Q&A in early screenings of this film and to have this manga artist give his nod of approval is a good sign.

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Journey into the Art of Star Wars Rebels, Oct 1st, 2019!

19 Feb

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Dark Horse Books and Lucasfilm proudly present the official look inside one of the galaxy’s most beloved shows in The Art of Star Wars Rebels (Amazon pre-order link). This book is going to be an incredible hardcover amassing art and creator commentary chronicling four seasons of adventure in a galaxy far, far away, and I am one who has put in an order right away.

No animated series has stayed faithful to the defining vision which visits “The Force” in The Clone Wars and what it represented in the original trilogy. It manages to go beyond, if not surpass, in my opinion. The last few episodes of the final season of Rebels ventures into new territory similar to Yoda’s adventure with Clone Wars: Lost Missions, and to anxiously wait for this book may well shed light in what Dave Filoni had in mind when those episodes were written.

From the Press Release:

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Can Fate be Changed with Iceman 2: Time Traveller?

17 Feb

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Following up on the events of the last film, The Iceman 2: The Time Traveller (冰封侠: 时空行者) proves He-Ying is a tough nut to crack. His loyalty is never questioned, but yet his brothers-in-arms are easily corruptible. This Chinese production is coming to North America courtesy of Well Go USA Entertainment with a video release on Feb 19th, 2019.

This film originally released in November 2018 to lacklustre box office results. When a lot of action-adventure Asian films are out to create that blockbuster experience ala Marvel Entertainment, director Raymond Yip tries his best and gives audiences Quantum Leap instead of Doctor Who. The lead is played by Hong Kong action star Donnie Yen (甄子丹).

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On the Making of Giltrude’s Dwelling, An Interview with Jeremy Lutter

22 Jan

giltrude dwelling_poster_smaller.jpgBy Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Giltrude’s Dwelling is set to make its hometown debut Jan 25th, during the Vancouver Shorts Film Fest, and writer Marcy Waughtal and director Jeremy Lutter could not be any happier. This piece is about a young girl who has seemingly lost her parents. They warn her about the dangers the outside has, especially at night. Their home teleports to new worlds every day. The question of whether it returns is asked, and by only going to see this work, answers can be given.

One night, the folks leave and Giltrude (played by Kennedi Clements, the young girl, and Kacey Rohl, adult) is waiting for their return. Years pass and this young lady has a lot to fear. However, there’s more to this work than meets the eye. Lutter saw something unique in Waughtal’s story and he believes it is has a lot to offer to the viewer.

“It’s a fairly common trait to let bad events have a big impact on your future,” said the filmmaker, “I have seen it ruin people’s lives. I also had my fair share of heartache in my life that I had to see past and not let it stop me. As soon as I read Waughtal’s script, it spoke to me.”

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