Tag Archives: Cloud Based Apps

Before Watching Locke & Key on Netflix, IDW’s “Welcome to Lovecraft” is available free!

7 Feb

Joehilllockekey.jpgBy Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Mention Joe Hill, and most fans of his works will most likely think of NOS4A2. It premiered last year to critical acclaim, and to follow up on this tale of terror is the Lovecraftian inspired Locke & Key on Netflix!

The series follows the adventures of three siblings– – who, after finding their father killed, move home to live with their mother Nina (Frances O’Connor). They discover the ancestral home is special, and gives them powers though possession of magical keys. When a sinister evil wants those artifacts, just what dangers they face means staying ahead …

The comic book ran from 2008 to 2013, and for those who have not had a chance to read the series that started it all, Graphite has an app and made the first story arc available to read for free! Five more volumes are available, and anyone subscribing (prices can begin from $6.50 on up) will have full access to Graphite’s library of over 25,000 comics, webtoons, manga titles, webcomics and strips, early access content and a fully ad-free reading experience!

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Powfolio Wants to Netflix Up the Comic Book World

20 Nov

DavidBy Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

Powfolio is a mobile app for iOS and Android looking to change how people look at comic books. This software has been out since early 2016 and they are making a new push to be known throughout the industry. Back in a different century, when printed versions could be found nearly everywhere, at corner stores and supermarkets, this era is distinguished by being able to find digital content very easily. While some towns may see a few supermarkets carry Archie paperbacks, to find that is very few and far between. CEO David Campiti (pictured top right) of Glass House Graphics (a talent agency / studio of artists who are hired to produce work for comic book companies like Dark Horse) fondly recalls those days when they were far more accessible. Today, the only place these rags can be found are at speciality operations.

“There was a McNamara’s drugstore right up the street from where I lived that carried almost everything, From Marvel, DC, Classics Illustrated, Gold Key, Harvey, Warren … If you name it, they had it,” recalled Campiti. “Skip forward to now, [the distribution of] comics have been shrunk down into a very niche market of 1800 shops scattered across the US. This means an entire generation of children has never held a comic book in their hands.”

As a father who delivered presentations at his young daughter’s school, talking about his job in the comic book industry, he’s seen the result of the times. In today’s digital age, he sees more children tuned to their mobiles than a paper product. As he was handing out free products (Marvel Comic’s X-Men) to the kids, he was astounded to hear one boy say, “You mean there’s a comic book too?”

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