Tag Archives: Jon Spaihts

Resurrecting Familiar Tropes in The Mummy (2017) Second Trailer

13 Apr

By Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

After looking at the second The Mummy trailer multiple times in the past few weeks since its release, I still can not shake the feeling I have seen this story before. I’m not as excited as the first trailer has led me to believe.

While I plan to see how this reboot helmed by director Alex Kurtzman and written by Jon Spaihts and Christopher McQuarrie pans out, I am setting the bar low because of what I have seen in past and present products about bringing dead Egyptians back to life. King Tut must be rolling in his grave; A film about his haunted tomb sounds like a better idea than where the creators are going with this film. At the same time, I’m left wondering if all the studio producers wanted is to take the best from what Stephen Sommers created from his trilogy and make simple creative changes to make this reboot seem original. After reading the fourth issue of Hammer Comic’s The Mummy, I’m finding I’m liking their story better. At least cults and hungry devourers from the afterlife are involved than a secret agenda which Dr Jekyll (played by Russell Crowe) no doubt harbours.

Much like Rick O’Connell, Nick Morton (Tom Cruise) is a soldier fighting in a war, and after a building gets blown up, he stumbles across a tomb (actually, a prison) which he makes the mistake of disturbing. He may also have a past that connects him to the Mummy (Sofia Boutella). Jenny (Annabelle Wallis) is just as smart as Evie and has knowledge of Ancient Egypt’s lines of pharaonic successors. As revealed in the first trailer, birds come crashing upon the transport plane carrying the sarcophagus, and as for whether the corpse was awake to summon them, that’s a detail not revealed. Maybe someone has read from a book to awaken The Mummy and to cause the carrier to crash. Everyone should be dead, except for Morton, and Jenny provides all the back story that’s needed to get people interested in this film up to speed.

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When Love is Fleeting in “Passengers,” A Movie Review

10 Jan

large_passengers

By Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

Although James Shaw was a “Passenger” with me to see the film starring Chris Pratt and Jennifer Lawrence, our opinions in this film are different. While he’s willing to tell me his thoughts, I keep on saying, you have to tell our readers here that. He needs to express himself to the world more than to me, and just like J.Law’s character wanting to ignore Pratt at a certain point in the film, it can’t be done. Eventually, some kind of peace has to be made. Maybe one day, my buddy will get the mojo needed to express his opinions out loud than to mutter it to me.

For this one-sided review, my Roger Ebert to his Gene Siskel (who is, like in the later series, was often missing due to illness), there’s not much to this film to enjoy. I thought the set design is terrific to look at and the real world physics of space travel plausible. This movie got me wondering about the world being left behind. Is the Earth overpopulated and only the rich can afford to leave? The starship Avalon is a luxury cruise ship that Jim (Pratt) finds himself in. Little does he know is that it is slowly malfunctioning — the reason behind his sudden awakening from hibernation — and had he investigated, he might have repaired the vehicle sooner than later.

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A Look at the Sneak Peak of Doctor Strange on IMAX 3D

11 Oct

doctor-strange-posterBy Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

I’m sure the numbers of how many people who attended the short preview to Doctor Strange (on a long weekend in North America) is as varied as the response to this film. While I’m excited to catch the end-product come November 4th (the 3D sequences when he’s flying through the multiverse look great), just how many die-hards can accept the movie’s obvious changes will determine its success. I’m okay with the gender-swapping of the Ancient One, and Tilda Swinton is a very respectable actress. With no successor to Mako Iwamatsu’s amazing presence, I’m guessing the producers had make changes lest they do a casting call throughout China / Tibet to find someone just as promising to fill the role.

When the introduction reveals nearly an hours’ worth of scenes are shot with IMAX cameras, the need to tease fans with what is to come is obvious — to spotlight the special effects on a box screen. I will certainly plan to see it again at the National Geographic IMAX Theatre. Sadly this operation plays these movies as a second-run product. Not every cinema has a proper screen to show off this format right.

In what is more in front and centre is Stephen Strange’s ego (Benedict Cumberbatch) which can easily rival Tony Stark’s. When he’s a famous neurosurgeon with some pent up frustrations over who he is required to operate on, the first few minutes works very well to show how conceited he is. That’s until he looks away from where he is driving to a cell phone (showing x-ray scans of his next patient instead of playing Pokémon GO) and winds up over a cliff. The slow-motion scene shows his hands getting crushed.

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