Tag Archives: Dark Comedy

When Vampires Attack! What We Do in the Shadows, A Review

22 Feb

By Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

What_We_Do_in_the_Shadows_posterSpecial Screening
in Victoria, BC (Update)

Feb 27 – Mar 5th
The Odeon Theatre
780 Yates Street

The Vic Theatre

Modern life is very rough for the ancient vampire. In Wellington, New Zealand, just What We Do in the Shadows presents a comical look into what life is truly like for these creatures of the night in a more humanist kind of way. They allowed a small crew of cameramen to follow them around to record their antics and to see them acknowledged time to time gives this movie an air of authenticity that can be appreciated. When the film is presented as a mockumentary, the laughs are well earned, and some horror lore enthusiasts will recognize the world that these creatures, along with the werewolves and zombies, belong in.

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No Horns are Locked Here, a Movie Review

1 Nov

horns_ver3_xlgSome fans of Daniel Radcliffe who still love him as Harry Potter may say he finally gets his chance to become Voldemort, even though this actor is certainly distancing himself from this character he helped bring into mainstream culture. In the movie Horns, he’s become a man of influence (which includes handling snakes). For some unknown reason, Iggy (Radcliffe) woke up to find devilish horns slowly growing out of him. Is that a result of a curse? That’s unknown, and there’s a mystery afoot at the same time. He’s been accused of the rape and murder of his girlfriend, Merrin Williams (Juno Temple), which has ostracized him in the town he lives in.

This supernatural black comedy is not without some allusions to the nature of what the Devil’s purpose truly is. It’s not because of the fact this figure can goad and cajole people into doing unspeakable acts, but rather in how influential it can be in people’s lives. That includes just walking into the room only to have some revealing their darkest thoughts like wishing a young girl will just simply shut up and accusing a mother for not doing her parental duty. That moment is not without some sardonic laughs. Radcliffe even pulls off some amusing reactions to everyone wanting to tell him their secrets.

When contrasted with flashback moments that reveals how Ig and Merrin became a couple in the midst of friends who also longed for her, there’s a decent whodunit to figure out who actually killed her. The surprise is not necessarily with who the person is but in who originally crafted this tale. Not many people will know that Joe Hill is the son of one of literary horror masters, Stephen King. This movie feels more like a summary of the book, and it’s condensed plotting is curious enough to have some people wanting to seek out the original treatment where its epilogue is different.

But even as a standalone product, Horns does a good job at highlighting the career path Radcliffe has chosen for himself. With challenging products, he’s shedding that image from the previous decade easily. He should keep those antlers on. The look suits him should he decide play a bad guy in any future films to come.

3½ Stars out of 5

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