Tag Archives: Book to Film

Counting the Goosebumps found in the Sequel…

27 Oct

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

* Spoiler Alert

Jack Black is more than R. L. Stine in the Goosebumps film franchise. His goofy charm on screen makes for a lot of fun. But when considering he’s also in The House with a Clock in Its Walls, which was in theatres last month, perhaps the lack of his presence was intentional so no confusion is made.

In the sequel, the heroes are Sarah Quinn (Madison Iseman), younger brother Sonny (Jeremy Ray Taylor) and friend to the family Sam Carter (Caleel Harris). The boys start up their own junkyard business and on their first job; they find a mysterious book inside a Pandora’s box. Before they know it, Slappy the Dummy (Mick Wingert), appears and they speak the words to give him life again.

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Casting News & Production Begins for Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark! Early Thoughts

3 Sep

Alvin Schwartz‘s book trilogy, Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, is getting ready to film, and headlining this work are Michael Garza (Wayward Pines, The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1), Austin Abrams (Brad’s Status, The Americans), Gabriel Rush (Moonrise Kingdom, The Grand Budapest Hotel), Austin Zajur (Fist Fight, Kidding), and Natalie Ganzhorn (Make it Pop). Production started this week and the first movie is due to hit theatres hopefully in the 2019/20 season.

This film is being produced by Guillermo del Toro, Sean Daniel, Jason Brown, J. Miles Dale and Elizabeth Grave. It will be directed by André Øvredal (The Autopsy of Jane Doe, Trollhunter), and the adaptation will be handled by Kevin Hageman and Dan Hageman (Trollhunters: Tales of Arcadia), del Toro, Patrick Melton &and Marcus Dunstan.

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Oh’s Not ‘Home’ Alone, A Movie Review

31 Mar

By Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest) and James Robert Shaw (The Wind up Geek)

Home_(2015_film)_posterE: Home is truly where the heart is, and in my case, that’s with living in the Pacific Northwest. In DreamWork‘s case, that message gets gently delivered when Oh (Jim Parsons) just does not know how to belong.

He’s an outcast in his own community. When the Boov aliens are always on the run from a menacing alien Gorg race (Brian Stepanek), there’s never any time for them to settle in and be neighbourly. These simpletons are led by Captain Smek (Steve Martin) who is even worse. And when they decide to claim Earth as their own and relocate the entire human population elsewhere, I’m left wondering if the billions of people can even live on one single continent? Well, tossing logic aside, I can accept a few questionable moments in this film’s story direction. Overall, it’s an enjoyable family film which delivers strong messages.

J: The story of Home is a double-edged sword. On one side it delivers a positive message about friendship. No matter what you look like or what background you’re from home is where your friends and family are.
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Discovering the Arts in The Giver, A Movie Review

14 Aug

By Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

The Giver Poster

* Spoiler Alert

Some audiences may well wonder if they are flipping through a century’s worth of National Geographic magazines when they are halfway through watching the movie, The Giver. The diverse collection of videos and images being used in this film gives this product a uniqueness not usually found for a science fiction film. That’s typically reserved for a documentary about sociology about the evolution of the human condition.

In this future, a utopian society has developed to take away all pain, emotions and memories of the past. Everything that defines a human culture, from its Hunter-Gatherer days to Industrialization (including war mongering and revolution) is lost as it becomes Aquarian. The new world order is strict, controlled and flat. Each person has a defined purpose in this new society and they are not allowed to deviate from it. That is, until Jonas (Brenton Thwaites) finds he’s alone in the Ceremony of Twelve (a rite of passage to help teens transition to adulthood) and is last to be assigned a role. He is identified as someone unique so he has a particular task to fulfill.

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