Tag Archives: Book Adaptation

Crazy Rich Asians in a Crazy Little Thing Called Love

20 Aug

Crazy Rich Asians Movie PosterBy Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

  • Spoiler Alert

Not every Asian is that rich, and nor are they members of the social elite. In Kevin Kwan‘s novel, Crazy Rich Asians, he is out to satirize that culture. The film of the same name certainly glamorizes what is, and how filthy, stinking rich some can become when they come into positions of power. When they are well connected, these people can advance far, and these nuances show up in the book trilogy. When they do not, just where they sit in this chaste society can either be in the lower echelons or high up.

Ultimately, this movie is more of a romantic comedy than a send-up of a who’s who of Singapore. The cultural notes are well placed and they offer nothing new to those who have studied this region. With the soundtrack, I believe it’s a foregone conclusion that in entertainment, the same old set of tunes are used over and over again instead of producers offering new scores to use. I recognized most of the tunes as I regularly heard them in my household back in the day. The fact they are still popular is scary!

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The Little Tears in Captain Underpants, A Movie Review

4 Jun

captain-underpants-new-posterBy Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

DreamWorks adaptation of Dav Pilkey‘s Captain Underpants, The First Epic Movie is deserving of one half juvenile delinquency at its finest and the other, I don’t get it. The humour can garner giggles to a very select crowd of young boys but for everyone else who are not familiar with the source material, this film is better off skipped.

I admire this studio’s original work and many adaptations because the writing teams often create a well-meaning tale about relationships. Whether that’s between unlikely personalities, family members or brothers in arms, the joy is in seeing how the bond becomes firm. Underpants is a tale about two mischief fourth graders, George Beard and Harold Hutchins, dealing with elementary school life. They try to brighten up life there because the place feels like it should belong in Pink Floyd’s The Wall, and they also fear where their friendship will go if the mean principal, Mr. Krupp, separates them.

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[Victoria Fringe Festival ’15] Adapting Neil Gaiman’s Fortunately, the Milk to Stage, A Review

31 Aug

By Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

IMG_3352 GOOD small

LOCATION:
The Roxy Theatre
2657 Quadra Street
Victoria, BC

SHOWTIMES:
September 1 | 6:00 pm
September 4 | 9:30 pm
September 5 | 8:30 pm
September 6 | 7:15 pm

DURATION: 60 minutes

Anyone familiar with Neil Gaiman‘s Fortunately, the Milk will find Windwhistle Theatre’s adaptation for the Fringe festival circuit captivating. Marion Jeffery is excellent giving life to the spoken word, and she commands the stage. When considering her background includes working at Birmingham Children’s Theatre in Birmingham, Alabama, and performing at The Kennedy Center, no one should be surprised. Both adults and children will be enthralled in how vividly well she can recall the text.

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Thar Be Treasures Found in Pirate’s Passage! A Review

5 Feb

By Ed Sum (The Vintage Tempest)

Priate_Passage_620x296-thumb-620xauto-366801

Available for streaming on CBC

Once when the word pirate is uttered, most people will think about the romance of sailing upon the high seas and catching sight of raging sunrises. These folks lived a scoundrel’s life and the only law they obeyed by was their own. Truth be told, life was not always rough; there’s more to how they endured for centuries than in how they are portrayed in cinema. In what one person values as property can become a ransom for high dollars under the right situation. In Canadian Broadcasting Corporation’s (CBC) animated film, Pirate’s Passage, that idea is played for high stakes.

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