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Lisa Wilcox on Alice and The Nightmare on Elm Street (Part Two)

11 Oct

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

This unabridged version also appears in the Oct/Nov issue of Absolute Underground Magazine as part of a combined article featuring Lisa Wilcox and Tuesday Knight. Reprinted with permission.

Anyone who has religiously followed the Nightmare on Elm Street (NoES) franchise will recall that Freddie Kruger is out for revenge. He’s after the children of the parents who killed him, and he is a tough presence to destroy. Add on the spinoffs into comic books, he’ll be around forever and he’s hardly a simple spirit.

In Freddy’s Dead: The Final Nightmare, we learn Kruger made a deal with Dream Demons: use fear to feed these malevolent creatures and he can live forever. Fans of the franchise will get to see cast mates from the third and fourth film reunite and talk about their time together at Hex Halloween Expo in Calgary, Alberta–taking place this weekend.

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Where’s the Longevity in Oren Peli’s Paranormal Activity after 10 Years?

7 Oct

Image result for paranormal activity releaseBy Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

The Paranormal Activity franchise ended many years ago. and some fans may argue it’s been a trailblazer for the found footage genre. Anastasia Hanna of mxdwn.com thinks so, and I have the opposite opinion. It’s been 10 years since its wide theatrical release on Oct 16, 2009 (technically 12 if you count the film festivals), and the last film was about three years ago. Unless there’s a steady stream of this franchise, interest will pitter off.

The impact of this franchise faded with the passage of time. This series has always been a social experiment from the get-go. It’s designed to see how many people will react to the jump scares than to follow the trail of clues offered in all the movies made to date. Blair Witch did a better job with this particular subgenre of horror films since it felt realistic. It did not depend on sequels to make a lasting impact which gets imitated in comedy variety shows and in pop culture. After six films, there’s nothing to even truly recall other than the one ‘scary’ scene where the bedroom door swings open and the fate of Katie and Micah unwinds for all to see.

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The NFB Defines The Physics of Sorrow

19 Sep

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Georgi Gospodinov’s “The Physics of Sorrow” is animated by Theodore Ushev (best known for Blind Yaysha), and this director/artist’s approach is hauntingly beautiful. It made its premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival (Sept 5-15, 2019) and is produced by the National Film Board of Canada. I suspect this animated short will have a few more cinematic screenings before becoming available online. I recommend the big screen version because of the artistry put into the work.

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Breaking IT Chapter Two Apart & What’s Next?

9 Sep

Image result for it chapter two posterBy Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Stephen King‘s horror universe is ripe for being turned into a cinematic powerhouse. When the movie IT has a label of ‘Chapter Two,’ it sets up the possibility of new original tales can be told.

Since The Conjuring can do it with its spinoffs, so can IT! James Wan‘s restrictive franchise of angry ghosts / demons terrorizing humans can only go so far as where the Paranormal Activity films went. To deliver all the backstory requires a collective to oversee production of recent releases—namely IT, Pet Semetary and Dark Tower—and having an original story arc to bring it all together for some massive confrontation. The teases offered in how the Native Indians dealt with the occult world has me interested and they can be the saviours. Two of these three films involve them and until Universal gets their monster-verse going, there is a gap to fill.

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