Archive | Book Reviews RSS feed for this section

Dark Horse Comics is At the Mountains of Madness June 26th!

15 Jun

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Publication Date: June 26, 2019
Dark Horse Comics

Go Tanabe’s adaptation of H.P. Lovecraft‘s At The Mountains of Madness is the greatest thing since sliced bread. When considering not many attempts to convert this novella to a consumer-friendly form exists–be it a movie (a comic book and two radio plays were made in the past)–I believe the first half of the tale is not too difficult. Filmmakers or storytellers most likely may borrow from John Carpenter’s The Thing to set the tone. To make the remainder wholly different is where the challenge lays.

This artist is no stranger to this author’s work either. In 2017, Dark Horse Comics published his adaptation of H.P. Lovecraft’s The Hound And Other Stories TPB (Amazon Link).

Continue reading

Advertisements

Wanting some Famous Monsters Ack-ives? Get ’em While They’re Hot!

7 Jun

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Very few magazines are considered collectible. To have magazines like Cinefex helped define my love for films. Sadly, those early issues are well-read and falling apart. There’s no denying I wish anthology collections exist so I can keep the originals safely stored and another to read to death.

Thankfully Fantastic Monsters of Filmland’s Ack-Ives is a from-the-archive series which has me smiling broader than Showa era Gojira on America’s love affair with the King of Monsters! The first volume is on all things Godzilla from both sides of the Pacific. It is worth picking up when I do not want to put any further wear to my early magazines. I am not surprised the super early issues are highly sought after by collectors. They tracked what was popular for the time when it was still in publication (1958 to 1983) and later revived ’93. They are some of Forrest J. Ackerman‘s finest work.

Continue reading

Reading In Between the Lines in War of the Spark: Ravnica

30 Apr

Enter a caption

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

  • Spoiler Alert

As a casual Magic the Gathering player who has been paying attention to the backstory on the cards, the novel War of the Spark: Ravnica intrigued me. The author, Greg Weisman is best known for his work in producing Disney’s Gargoyles and Young Justice. His vision gave us characters to love. With his original work Rain of Ghosts, the world around the Florida keys is wonderfully flavourful and his narrative approach makes the two books easy reads.

In Ravnica, the struggle is real. While I could not put down the Rain series, I had to start pausing and spend each day reading a few chapters. He is working in a universe not of his design. Wizards of the Coast hired him in their bid to return to publishing fiction and he should have insisted on focussing on a handful of characters he is genuinely interested in instead of the other way around.

The story jumps from multiple points of view and I prefer the one with Teyo the Shieldmage first and Liliana the Necromancer over all the others. With more than a dozen planeswalkers descending upon Ravnica to take down Nicol Bolas, the huge amount of characters involved are simply overwhelming. Thankfully, each chapter has a name of the person it’s focussing in on so I can jump to the parts I want to read.

Continue reading

Humour Me Amadeus! A Book Review

24 Apr

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Young Mozart is a delightful masterpiece of art and humour for young readers to enjoy. This book will certainly lift any spirit up, and there are fun activities, like a maze and crossword puzzle, included too! William Augel‘s creation inspired me to watch the movie, Amadeus, again because is brought forth that essence I recall in the film. His narrative approach includes the style from the Sunday funnies.

For those able to read sheet music, the scores found in this book are playable. I remember enough from my youth where I learned piano. But with no synthesizer nearby, I must visit a music store with a preview page and hope I do not embarrass myself. While I can’t say if they are straight from Mozart’s compositions or not, I’m inclined to assume they are.

Continue reading