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Humour Me Amadeus! A Book Review

24 Apr

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Young Mozart is a delightful masterpiece of art and humour for young readers to enjoy. This book will certainly lift any spirit up, and there are fun activities, like a maze and crossword puzzle, included too! William Augel‘s creation inspired me to watch the movie, Amadeus, again because is brought forth that essence I recall in the film. His narrative approach includes the style from the Sunday funnies.

For those able to read sheet music, the scores found in this book are playable. I remember enough from my youth where I learned piano. But with no synthesizer nearby, I must visit a music store with a preview page and hope I do not embarrass myself. While I can’t say if they are straight from Mozart’s compositions or not, I’m inclined to assume they are.

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Author Profile: Scotto Moore, The Next Rod Serling?

24 Apr

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Scotto Moore is a playwright from Seattle, Washington bringing his style of the bizarre to the printed word. After being a singer at an early age and studying theatre in college, he blended the two in a bunch of works for the Annex. Locally, they were very well received and some of his works can be found online. This achievement made him seriously decide on what the next big step for his career should be.

After spending 15 years producing shows like H. P. Lovecraft: Stand-Up Comedian! (it’s available on YouTube) and offering web series like CHERUB: The Vampire With Bunny Slippers, to imprint his style to the masses, his book Your Favorite Band Cannot Save You is the next logical step. He favours writing science fiction, but in this recent work, it’s a blend of horror and heavy metal.

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Blood on Black Wax: Horror Soundtracks, (& Musicals) An Interview Redux

16 Apr

By Ed Sum and Ira Hunter

Release Date: May 13, 2019
Available for pre-order on Amazon

Blood on Black Wax: Horror Soundtracks on Vinyl is a wonderful book which looks back at nearly all the music from the greatest horror cinema classics. No, we are not talking about a rerelease of all these tunes, but instead, we will get an opening of a time capsule which looks at the unique history and artwork of these works. This hardbound, full-colour, 240-page book ​spotlights the intricate (and often rare) artwork on the LP sleeves, as well as album reviews, release details, and wild backstories.

Jeff Szpirglas reviews albums and old movies for Rue Morgue Magazine, and his bibliography does not end there. He’s written many books for young readers and is a second-grade full-time teacher. This vocation puts him in an interesting position should he decide to demonstrate his love for horror to impressionable minds. Aaron Lupton is the music editor for the said magazine and is a passionate and nerdy collector of horror soundtrack LPs. He also is the co-host of From My Parents Basement podcast with Eric Gaudet and Gary Pullin.

In what prompted the decision to create this book was when Szpirglas approached Aaron about putting together a special edition digest issue of the magazine focusing specifically on horror soundtracks. At the time, Rue Morgue had been releasing special editions on subjects ranging from horror collectables to Canadian horror, and he felt that a soundtrack book was a no-brainer. In his own words, So much of what makes these films effective often comes from sound and music working in conjunction with the images and the rhythms of editing.

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War Bears, A Tribute to the Yesteryears

2 Apr

 

By Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Publisher: Dark Horse Comics
Publication Date: March 27, 2019

Format: FC, 104 pages; HC; 6 5/8″ x 10 3/16″
Price: $19.99

War Bears is a fond tribute to the comics of yesteryear and is, more importantly, a look at the troubled times which plagued smaller publishing houses. In a time when the war effort hurt the local economy, cutting costs and exports made life tougher. Enter Al Zurakowski, an artist struggling to make ends meet. He’s optimistic about the future and thinks achieving the American dream is possible. But hold on, this is Canada! Life is tougher and colder. The reality is that not every publisher struck gold with their comic book creations.

He has an idea to make a francophone heroine, Oursonette. I looked at the first issue and loved the world Margaret Atwood and Ken Steacy crafted. The era came alive with Steacy’s artwork. The attention to detail with the drab and the idealized romance was an easy sell.

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